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A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 24 November, 2018 03:11PM
Has anybody lately read a good horror/weird/scifi book to recommend?

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 25 November, 2018 12:14AM
I enjoyed the following stories, which all contain horror, weird, and science fiction elements:

John W. Campbell: "Who Goes There?", "Twilight", "Night"
A. E. Van Vogt: "The Monster", "Dormant", The Voyage of the Space Beagle, Mission to the Stars
Jack Vance: Star King, The Brains of Earth, The Houses of Iszm (if you find horror implicit in weird beauty).

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Avoosl Wuthoqquan (IP Logged)
Date: 25 November, 2018 05:29AM
Allow me to recommend Demiurge: The Complete Cthulhu Mythos Tales of Michael Shea, by -- well -- Michael Shea, most of whose stuff is amazing in my opinion. His oddly titled novel In Yana, the Touch of Undying is weird (very weird!) fantasy with lots of horror elements.

Shea's writing tends to be very detailed, his ideas are often extremely surprising, and I don't recall ever reading a boring sentence by the guy.

I wasn't super impressed by his dystopian SF action novella The Extra, but one scene -- in which a dog is attacked and torn to bits by a giant robot spider -- still sticks in my mind. Anyone who can make such nonsense visceral and believable is a master in my estimation.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 25 November, 2018 02:01PM
Thanks. I have ordered Polyphemus from the library.

Always good to find a new author!

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 26 November, 2018 02:20PM
Speaking of "Who Goes There?", the other day I read a short story called "From An Amber Block" (1930) by Tom Curry about a huge mass of amber with something dark inside. It is sent to a museum where the dark thing gets out of the amber block at night and kills people. When the characters were considering the strange amber with the ominous dark thing imprisoned inside, the opening parts of "Who Goes There?" came immediately to mind though I am sure Campbell, in writing his masteripece, knew nothing about Curry´s story.

By the way, today I finished re-reading "The Hole of the Pit" (1914) by Adrian Ross and I enjoyed it as I did when I read it for the first time some years ago. It tells a story about a castle standing in huge marshes and surrounded by an enemy so there is no escape for those inside while there is some hideous and nameless evil comming out of the swamps. Sometimes it seems as if huge snakes were coiling under the dirty surface and when a dead man is thrown into the water, his hideously mutilated corpse is thrown back from the mud. Really a nice little book of horror. :-)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 26 Nov 18 | 02:41PM by Minicthulhu.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 26 November, 2018 04:53PM
I have had in mind to read "The Hole of the Pit", but have not yet had a chance to come across it. Aren't the spooks 'traditional' rather than original?

Michael Shea's "Polyphemus" and "Fat Face" are not to be missed (most fans would foremost also mention "The Autopsy")!
Nifft the Lean was impressive, but the prose was a bit too technically dense for me - however, several worthwhile fantastic moments! Brilliant. I look forward to reading In Yana, the Touch of Undying.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 27 November, 2018 01:52AM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Nifft the Lean ...

I found most of the introductions to the novellas impenetrable - too many names introduced without proper attachment. The last novella, "The Goddess in Glass" was in ways incomprehensible; the words just passed me by. Not a book I wholeheartedly recommend, except for "Come Then, Mortal. We Will Seek Her Soul" and "The Pearls of the Vampire Queen" which are good, ... and "The Fishing of the Demon-Sea" which is exceptional.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 27 November, 2018 08:51AM
It is not a classic "spook tale" in the style of M.R.James who was a friend of Ross and to him, by the way, the book is dedicated. The main aspects of the book are an Earl growing mad, an evil Italian woman, a puritan hero, a beautiful and chaste girl, a family curse, a gelatinous creature living in the depths of the marshlands, a ghost of a murdered wife (or what it was :-)) and last but not least an old castle standing in the swamps, besieged by enemies and filled to the roof with dynamite. :-)
Here you have several reviews of the book. On of them likens it to "The Terror" by Dan Simmons or "The Thing" by John Carpenter which I am not sure about but the fact is there is the element of being in a desolate place where on has nowhere to run, with an unknown creature that can strike any time.

[www.goodreads.com]

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 28 November, 2018 04:08PM
A. E. van Vogt's good short story "The Monster" is here available online, for those not lucky enough to have it in glorious paperback.

http://prosperosisle.org/spip.php?article220

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 29 November, 2018 01:38PM
Thanks. I am gonna read it one of these days.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 30 November, 2018 01:25AM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Thanks. I am gonna read it one of these days.

I am not sure what your preferences are, but it appears to be mainly older atmospheric horror and supernatural fiction. "The Monster" is actually quite different, it does not place Man in the position of victim like Lovecraft does and traditional horror; its approach is from the opposite direction. So it may be a disappointment to some, or not. Its reward comes from an intellectually uplifting idea. Van Vogt believed positively in Mankind's future potential, much like Arthur C. Clarke did.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 2 December, 2018 05:53PM
I just read the first paragraph of "Hawley Bank Foundry" by L. T. C. Rolt, an author I have never read before. A hunch tells me this is going to be great. He has a very funny sense of sardonic humor. I'll be back when I am done.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 3 December, 2018 03:20PM
Thanks, please do.

I'll look forward to the report.

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 4 December, 2018 08:41AM
Ok, I have read "The Monster" by A. E. Vogt. Well, at first I was afraid it was some 1940´s sci-fi version of "Some Words With a Mummy" by Poe but fortunately it turned out to be something different. I will not say I will read it again but its plot was interesting.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 5 December, 2018 07:21PM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> "Hawley Bank Foundry" by L. T. C. Rolt ...

I understand that Rolt was also an industrial machine engineer and historian, knowledge which he used in his ghost stories to instill them with convincing detailed settings. (Let's face it, most fantasist authors are dreamers and not very practical in other matters than writing. It is a joy to read a text which gives the illusion of actual movement of energy, workers in strenuous, stoic effort of shoving heavy masses around, and constructing impressive physical objects, while you sit in your comfy chair and lazily watch it performed through your book.) In this story he also reveals obvious familiarity with pushing ambitious business men, effective at making money but with little imagination for else; which serves the amusing aspect here. Otherwise a story in similar English tradition as M. R. James, but not quite as high quality as his from the supernatural standpoint. Easy to read clear prose that draws you in. I enjoyed it, especially the excellent settings with foreboding little touches.
However, the older I get the more impatient I grow with these commonly constructed stories, in which you first have to read a long preparatory realistic build-up (you must eat up your potatoes first, lots of them!) before finally, by the end, being served the delicious supernatural dessert. Although he throws in a few spectral suggestions along the way, I do prefer literature that is more or less feverishly supernatural fantasy from beginning to end.

The central setting of this story is an iron foundry work. You can imagine, an accident in there may lead to nasty consequences. Or, 'nasty', that is a grave understatement.

But even more horrible than this story is a real life story I heard on the news a few years ago, taking place in a Chinese iron foundry. A large amount of molten iron was accidentally dropped onto the floor. In a nearby changing room the next shift was preparing for work; the iron flowed in through the door. When others came to inspect several hours later, the floor of the changing room was covered by an even layer of iron; there was not even a trace of the missing men.

I read "Hawley Bank Foundry" in the highly regarded collection A Wave of Fear.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 5 December, 2018 07:35PM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Ok, I have read "The Monster" by A. E. Vogt. Well,
> at first I was afraid it was some 1940´s sci-fi
> version of "Some Words With a Mummy" by Poe but
> fortunately it turned out to be something
> different. I will not say I will read it again but
> its plot was interesting.


It is fortunate that you at least found it interesting. Van Vogt is all about ideas, futuristic ideas, sometimes gigantic ideas that strain your sanity. But his prose is very uneven, sometimes sloppy, especially in the novels. The single short stories are better written, some very well.

They say that while other science fiction writers wrote about the future, van Vogt wrote from the future.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: xtrmntr1 (IP Logged)
Date: 6 December, 2018 11:28AM
Hi all,

For anyone interested, I self-published an apocalyptic cosmic horror novel. It's a touch on the graphic side and is probably pretty crap, but if you're looking for something like that, feel free to check it out.

US [www.amazon.com]

UK [www.amazon.co.uk]

Hope this sort of thing isn't too tacky. Anyway, cheer.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 7 December, 2018 02:57PM
From a collection named "Wolf's Complete Book of Terror", I read "The Hours in the Life of a Lousy-Haired Man' an episode from Maldoror by Comte de Lautréamont.

I still don't know what to make of it.

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 7 December, 2018 04:27PM
The collection looks very interesting, maybe I will give it a try in the future. By the way, speaking of short story collections, one of these days I am expecting to get a book called "The People Of The Pit and Other Early Horrors from the Munsey Pulps." It is a collection of short stories that were published in Frank Munsey´s pulp magazines prior to 1920. I know next to nothing about Frank Munsey but he seems to have been a pioneer in publishing what is generally called "pulp magazines", so I am curious what the book is going to turn out to be. A collection of short stories that came out in magazines that were a grandfather of Weird Tales, Astounding Stories, Tales of Terror etc.? We shall see. :-)

[www.goodreads.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 7 Dec 18 | 04:33PM by Minicthulhu.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 8 December, 2018 12:30PM
Thanks!

I'm developing a pretty good list of new (to me) weird fiction to explore next year!

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: GreenFedora (IP Logged)
Date: 13 December, 2018 02:56PM
Side note: I took a college course with Leonard Wolf and his "Complete Book of Terror" was the textbook. I did my thesis for the class on Clark Ashton Smith. What goes around, right?

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 14 December, 2018 12:37PM
Hah! Pretty neat!

Quite a varied collection, isn't it? I recently mentioned another varied and eclectic collection, "The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories" edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer. It is 110 stories from all across the spectrum.

I'm a cheapskate and first got it from the library, but plan to buy it soon.

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 22 February, 2019 06:15PM
Has anyone read Philip José Farmer's collection Strange Relations? How is the quality of the writing and imagination? Is it rich? Would it appeal to someone who enjoys Clark Ashton Smith?

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 22 February, 2019 07:42PM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Has anyone read Philip José Farmer's collection
> Strange Relations? How is the quality of the
> writing and imagination? Is it rich? Would it
> appeal to someone who enjoys Clark Ashton Smith?

It's not clear from the above if you're asking about Farmer, in general, or how this particular collection is. I'll gamble that it's the former, and must admit to having not read the collection.

Farmer is one of those authors whose main strength is originality of idea rather than true writing ability. I'll quickly add context: I'm reading a short story collection by Rudyard Kipling, mainly because I got it for free from Project Gutenberg. I am in a sense discovering him for the first time.

In my humble opinion, the man is narrative genius. I learned today that had been awarded the Nobel Prize for literature, and considered it to be justified. He's been out of vogue due to changing sensibilities concerning cultural interactions (read: he expresses the commonly held 19th C idea that western civilization, and in particular British civilization, are the apogee of human cultural development).

But enough!

Farmer is a good writer, but no Smith. For example, I would rate him below R. A. Lafferty in t erms of execution. He has some very interesting, and amusing, ideas. I would point to the novel Flesh as an example, which is to me better than his Riverworld series.

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 23 February, 2019 03:25AM
Thanks Sawfish. I am particularly curious about the collection Strange Relations, because I understand it is about Man's meeting and interaction with alien and weird animal/plant life, a subject related to Smith's bizarre conceptions.

There is an omnibus collection by the same name, which includes Strange Relations and the novels Flesh and The Lovers. All those works seem connected in subject matter.

I have never read anything by Philip José Farmer. As a teen I remember handling his Riverworld books while they were on the shelves in the book stores, but did not find them teasing my curiosity enough. Instead I picked books by Alan Dean Foster, H. P. Lovecraft, and Jack Vance. Clark Ashton Smith was not readily available at the time, and I discovered him only ten years later.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 23 February, 2019 03:33AM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> As a teen ... I picked books by Alan Dean Foster, H. P.
> Lovecraft, and Jack Vance.

Among others, including Edgar Rice Burroughs of course!

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 23 February, 2019 12:17PM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Thanks Sawfish. I am particularly curious about
> the collection Strange Relations, because I
> understand it is about Man's meeting and
> interaction with alien and weird animal/plant
> life, a subject related to Smith's bizarre
> conceptions.
>
> There is an omnibus collection by the same name,
> which includes Strange Relations and the novels
> Flesh and The Lovers. All those works seem
> connected in subject matter.
>
> I have never read anything by Philip José Farmer.
> As a teen I remember handling his Riverworld books
> while they were on the shelves in the book stores,
> but did not find them teasing my curiosity enough.

This is understandable. I got pretty tired of dialogues with famous deceased characters. It was amusing in a sort of irreverent way, and now that I think of it, one of the main characters, Mark Twain, was probably a big influence on Farmer as a wit. I suspect that he wanted to have the same playful sensibilities as Twain.

But Flesh is something else...

Imagine a future world that has some of the same grounding entities--there's a sort of United States--but the central feature of this alternate universe, at least in this alter-US, is a fertility cult that is the national religion.

Each year a sort of sacrificial "stag king" is selected and treated with both hormones and cultural veneration until each spring, when he is turned loose on a sort of ceremonial procession along the east coast, to Washington DC, or what passes for it, fornicating all women in his path. This is considered highly desirable, to give birth to the child of the stag king, and the entire progress is played for ironic, comic effect.

The authorial tone is lighthearted and absurd, and is quite an amusing read.

No serious topics are broached, which is fine for entertainment, but lots of cultural icons are parodied. Baseball as the national pass time, in one notable instance.

So once I read a short story by a 1950s SF author in a large anthology. Maybe I was about 11 or 12. The theme was loss of religious faith by a starship's chaplain because the mission had happened on the burnt out remnant of the planetary system destroyed by the nova that was the star of Bethlehem. There had been an advanced, but planet-bound civilization that had known of the impending immolation, prepared and preserved artifacts for subsequent explores to discover, then perished.

This understandably depressed the chaplain.

Farmer does not write stuff like this; he'd like to be Twain.

> Instead I picked books by Alan Dean Foster, H. P.
> Lovecraft, and Jack Vance. Clark Ashton Smith was
> not readily available at the time, and I
> discovered him only ten years later.

Me, too, and it did not take long for him to stand out once I'd read Zothique, my first exposure.

That was 1969 or 1970, I think.

Always nice to exchange with you!

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 23 February, 2019 01:50PM
Sawfish Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> This is understandable. I got pretty tired of
> dialogues with famous deceased characters. ...

Ha Ha Ha! I remember now, feeling immediately tired only from reading it in the blurbs on the backside of the books.

> But Flesh is something else...

It certainly sounds a whole lot more interesting.

> So once I read a short story by a 1950s SF author
> in a large anthology. Maybe I was about 11 or 12.
> The theme was loss of religious faith by a
> starship's chaplain because the mission had
> happened on the burnt out remnant of the planetary
> system destroyed by the nova that was the star of
> Bethlehem. There had been an advanced, but
> planet-bound civilization that had known of the
> impending immolation, prepared and preserved
> artifacts for subsequent explores to discover,
> then perished.
>
> This understandably depressed the chaplain.

I believe that is a short-story by Arthur C. Clarke. It was very good. I think I read it in his collection The Nine Billion Names of God. "Rescue Party" is my favorite story from that collection, both weird and humorous ... a group of scientist aliens from different planets set out together on a quest, but their individual anatomies can't handle the gravity of the surface, stumbling and falling, jeering at each other.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 23 Feb 19 | 02:17PM by Knygatin.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 24 February, 2019 10:29AM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Sawfish Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > This is understandable. I got pretty tired of
> > dialogues with famous deceased characters. ...
>
> Ha Ha Ha! I remember now, feeling immediately
> tired only from reading it in the blurbs on the
> backside of the books.
>
> > But Flesh is something else...
>
> It certainly sounds a whole lot more interesting.
>
> > So once I read a short story by a 1950s SF
> author
> > in a large anthology. Maybe I was about 11 or
> 12.
> > The theme was loss of religious faith by a
> > starship's chaplain because the mission had
> > happened on the burnt out remnant of the
> planetary
> > system destroyed by the nova that was the star
> of
> > Bethlehem. There had been an advanced, but
> > planet-bound civilization that had known of the
> > impending immolation, prepared and preserved
> > artifacts for subsequent explores to discover,
> > then perished.
> >
> > This understandably depressed the chaplain.
>
> I believe that is a short-story by Arthur C.
> Clarke. It was very good. I think I read it in his
> collection The Nine Billion Names of God. "Rescue
> Party" is my favorite story from that collection,
> both weird and humorous ... a group of scientist
> aliens from different planets set out together on
> a quest, but their individual anatomies can't
> handle the gravity of the surface, stumbling and
> falling, jeering at each other.

Hah! I'll try to find it, for nostalgia's sake.

Here's a puzzler for me, and maybe you can help me with it. It's about an SF story from the same era as the Clarke one.

Mars chooses to announce itself to the world by setting up a shop on one of the main shopping thoroughfares on Manhattan. The goods are truly amazing and this causes quite a stir.

For some reason the sales staff--masked, mysterious, probably--raises suspicion, and the store is raided by the police after hours. The Martians are tipped and escape, taking most of their stuff with them. However, documents are recovered that reveal that the sales mission was a front to set up for a full-scale invasion of the Earth.

The UN meets, and the world powers of the time, US and USSR, agree to cooperate to oppose this existential threat. Mankind is unified for the first time in history.

Then it is revealed that the entire Martian episode was financed by a group of international philanthropists who hoped to unite the peoples of the earth, and avoid a nuclear war. There were no Martians, at all.

I *believe* the title was something like "Mars Shops, Ltd.".

Do you recall anything like this?

BTW, I was also unduly influenced, as a callow youth, by Asimov's "Nightfall". :^)

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 24 February, 2019 12:13PM
I am afraid I don't know which story that is. The initial premise sounds similar to A. E. Van Vogt's "The Weapon Shop", although the locations don't quite correlate. I think these came from the future, not Mars, and they sold weapons to help citizens protect themselves against the abusive State. The weapons were actually free, to all with honest intentions.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 24 February, 2019 05:05PM
Well, thanks!

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 25 February, 2019 11:46AM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> A. E. Van Vogt's
> "The Weapon Shop", ... they sold weapons to help
> citizens protect themselves against the abusive
> State.

This calls for a small correction. Not the State as such, of course. But the deep State, that is those in corrupt power behind the screens, acting in secrecy, those who control the money flow, and pull the strings of the representative puppets placed (or, in the very least tolerated, as is the case of Trump) in mock forefront administrative government.

A. E. van Vogt was actually well aware of this in real life (John F. Kennedy and Abraham Lincoln are two politicians who were also very well aware of this; both murdered because they tried to oppose it.); his father, who was a travelling lawyer with wide experience and insights into practical political process, told the young Alfred about it. And Vogt often used it later as a model to build up drama in his science fiction stories.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 4 March, 2019 12:00PM
Has anyone read the following books, and how would you rate them? (It is always interesting to hear critique from readers who have the fine and unprecedented prose of Clark Ashton Smith as reference.)

More Than Human by Theodore Sturgeon
The Stars My Destination by Alfred Bester
The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin

All three seem widely regarded as being among the very best science fiction novels ever written. Especially so The Left Hand of Darkness. Its setting appears very modern and in line with confused contemporary feminist political values, in which Western women are urged to become independent from men and from family life, refrain from having children, do the same things men do, behave like men, and mentally free themselves from their biological gender identity; perhaps one reason why the book is unanimously embraced? I once tried to read Le Guin's A Wizard of Earthsea in my search for classical fantasy, but it did not grab me and I gave up after a few pages.

I have read Arthur C. Clarke's The City and the Stars, and think it is a stunning masterpiece of weird futuristic vision, and a very enjoyable read. Perhaps it is similar to some of the novels above?

Another author I have never got around to read, and which keeps nagging at the back of my mind, one of the most famous of all, is Robert A. Heinlein. Do you think he is essential required reading?

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 4 March, 2019 06:51PM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Has anyone read the following books, and how would
> you rate them? (It is always interesting to hear
> critique from readers who have the fine and
> unprecedented prose of Clark Ashton Smith as
> reference.)
>
> More Than Human by Theodore Sturgeon
> The Stars My Destination by Alfred Bester
> The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin
>
> All three seem widely regarded as being among the
> very best science fiction novels ever written.
> Especially so The Left Hand of Darkness. Its
> setting appears very modern and in line with
> confused contemporary feminist political values,
> in which Western women are urged to become
> independent from men and from family life, refrain
> from having children, do the same things men do,
> behave like men, and mentally free themselves from
> their biological gender identity; perhaps one
> reason why the book is unanimously embraced? I
> once tried to read Le Guin's A Wizard of Earthsea
> in my search for classical fantasy, but it did not
> grab me and I gave up after a few pages.
>
> I have read Arthur C. Clarke's The City and the
> Stars, and think it is a stunning masterpiece of
> weird futuristic vision, and a very enjoyable
> read. Perhaps it is similar to some of the novels
> above?
>
> Another author I have never got around to read,
> and which keeps nagging at the back of my mind,
> one of the most famous of all, is Robert A.
> Heinlein. Do you think he is essential required
> reading?

I read quite a bit of Heinlein when in 7th/8th grade.

He had no appeal to me after that point, and I wondered why. It much later came to me that he was in essence a sort of Ayn Rand for juveniles. His personal opinions are expressed in fiction, and as such, they work well since he's writing it and can manipulate the outcome to reach desired outcomes.

And, like Rand, he is absolutely certain that he is correct.

But this is just my opinion.

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 5 March, 2019 02:22AM
Thanks. Yes, that impression of his personality has prevented me from reading him. Many seem to like Heinlein's Starship Troopers best. I thought the movie was a bit too much 'military' (although I enjoyed Phil Tippett's special effects). But they say the book is different, more nuanced.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 5 March, 2019 03:40AM
Sawfish Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I read quite a bit of Heinlein when in 7th/8th
> grade.

In 7th/8th/9th grade Stranger in a Strange Land stood in my school library. I fiddled a bit with it, ... but its thickness was daunting. And also, since it had been put in the school library, that made me suspicious. Instead I read Stephen King. ;^) Today they probably place Stephen King in the public school libraries.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 8 March, 2019 06:10AM
Sawfish Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I read quite a bit of Heinlein when in 7th/8th
> grade.
>
> He had no appeal to me after that point, and I
> wondered why. ... His
> personal opinions are expressed in fiction, and as
> such, they work well since he's writing it and can
> manipulate the outcome to reach desired outcomes.
>
> And, ... he is absolutely certain that he
> is correct.
>
> But this is just my opinion.

Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Thanks. Yes, that impression of his personality
> has prevented me from reading him.

Let me rephrase that; it's not that he was sure of his own opinions that hold me off. But rather the quality of his outlook. My impression has been that he was preoccupied with worldly, mundane values, such as career, manliness, marriage, weapons, military, ... and used science fiction as a superficial backdrop for this, rather than having a genuine cosmic outlook. That's just been my impression of his person. But not having read his books, I may of course be wrong.

But being sure of ones opinions, or rather, being sure of ones acquired knowledge, is not a bad thing. Intellectual authority is helpful in art, the greatest artists have it. It gives a clearness of expression. Artists who are unsure of themselves, and of their impressions, are often weak artists. So I believe that to have self confidence and firmly stand ones intellectual ground (while being open to gradually developing it, of course), is a good quality. At least so in a reasonably intelligent person. Stubbornness in a stupid person is another matter.

Lovecraft was another example of one having intellectual authority and strong opinions.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 8 March, 2019 11:27PM
Certainly I agree on Lovecraft.

In a sense, he is almost sci-fiction in his creation of the mythos. It's as if he is describing an alternate earth--one whose past epochs include multiple invasions of alien beings, now mythologized from humanity's point of view. He postulates that this unknown history is so ancient that all remnants have been effaced over time--except for a few remote places.

And he wrote this at the last possible era in which this might be credible; prior to the advent of routine satellite surveillance it was conceivably, barely, that
there might still be unknown regions on earth, and that the few remnants of these former residents, as in At the Mountains of Madness, might be found there.

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 9 March, 2019 09:16AM
Sawfish Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> In a sense, [Lovecraft] is almost sci-fiction in his
> creation of the mythos. ...
> And he wrote this at the last possible era in
> which this might be credible; prior to the advent
> of routine satellite surveillance it was
> conceivably, barely, that
> there might still be unknown regions on earth, ...

The era of E. R. Burroughs, A. Merritt, H. P. Lovecraft, C. A. Smith, and R. E. Howard, gradually fizzling out by the end of the 1930s. Replaced by the Golden Age of science fiction, exploring new and interesting frontiers. And later came pure fantasy fiction, to meet the need for escape from the cynically increasing materialism of society. New weird tales often became more of nostalgia entertainment, having lost its earlier spirit of genuine conviction and credibility. And supernatural horror fiction was intentionally turned (degraded) into a symbolic tool for psychological social-workers (the likes of Robert Aickman), regarding itself as having an "important" society function, rather than creating genuine fear, awe or ecstasy.

I think there is still potential for genuine weird and supernatural fiction, but it needs a brilliant mind to step forward, that is not swayed by the present level of collective consciousness, and in vision penetrates beyond the relatively puny levels of science.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 9 March, 2019 05:25PM
Excellent observations.

Thanks!

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 10 March, 2019 03:04AM
I am presently reading Stanislaw Lem's Solaris. It is excellent, serious science fiction, descriptive and dense. I think it is the best SF I have read, alongside Arthur C. Clarke.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 10 March, 2019 03:16AM
Solaris ... in the first English translation, by Joanna Kilmartin and Steve Cox.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 11 March, 2019 01:36PM
Yesterday, I finished reading Gustav Meyrink´s "Golem". One of the strangest book I ever read.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 12 March, 2019 12:14AM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Yesterday, I finished reading Gustav Meyrink´s
> "Golem". One of the strangest book I ever read.


And its events are placed in beautiful old Prague too! I have not read it, only of it, in Lovecraft's essay on horror literature. Perhaps it is directly related to Smith's "The Colossus of Ylourgne".

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 12 March, 2019 05:45AM
Beautiful old Prague? Well, yes, the old Prague was (and is, for that matter) beautiful, but "Golem" takes place strictly in the Jewish ghetto before the huge sanation (almost 150 unique houses were pulled down) that took place in the first years of the 19. Century. So the reader cannot expect some beautiful architecture, the regal palaces, the broad streets lined with the tall old-fashioned buildings, that makes Prague famous but something very close to what is on the pictures below; old, dirty houses; mysterious, ill-lit alleys; inscrutable nooks; nets of underground vaulted cellars etc. On the other hand, this decrepit and unattractive environment perfectly matches the story.

[www.praguecityline.cz]

I have not read The Colossus of Ylourgne" but I will one of these days to say if there is any relation between it and "Golem".



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12 Mar 19 | 05:49AM by Minicthulhu.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 12 March, 2019 09:03AM
By the way, Meyrink wrote many short stories, some of them very bizzare and weird. The best ones are probably “Dr. Cinderella´s Plants“ about hideous experiments with plants and human bodies, “Das Präparat“ (I do not know if this story has been translated into English) where certain things of a room equipment (the bell-pull, the clock, the door-knob) are made of parts of a human body, and “Der Verdunstete Gehrin“ (also not sure if this one exists in an English translation) dealing with a crazy, deadly hallucination produced by consumption of poisonous mushrooms. Meyrink is definitely worth reading though sometimes he is hard to understand and tedious in places.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 12 March, 2019 01:32PM
Wow!

Great recommendation!

The Golem is available in German, from Project Gutenberg. I wish I could read it in the native language.

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 12 March, 2019 01:40PM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Beautiful old Prague? ...
> "Golem" takes place strictly in the Jewish ghetto
> before the huge sanation (almost 150 unique houses
> were pulled down) that took place in the first
> years of the 19. Century. So the reader cannot
> expect some beautiful architecture, .... old, dirty houses; mysterious,
> ill-lit alleys; inscrutable nooks; nets of
> underground vaulted cellars etc. On the other
> hand, this decrepit and unattractive environment
> perfectly matches the story.

I see, not all pleasant then, ... although I am sure Lovecraft for one, would have enjoyed exploring the underground vaulted cellars, and alleys with spectral peaked gables, in an ecstatic mood of "adventurous expectancy".


Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> By the way, Meyrink wrote many short stories, some
> of them very bizzare and weird. The best ones are
> probably “Dr. Cinderella´s Plants“ about
> hideous experiments with plants and human bodies,
> “Das Präparat“ (I do not know if this story
> has been translated into English) where certain
> things of a room equipment (the bell-pull, the
> clock, the door-knob) are made of parts of a human
> body, and “Der Verdunstete Gehrin“ (also not
> sure if this one exists in an English translation)
> dealing with a crazy, deadly hallucination
> produced by consumption of poisonous mushrooms.
> Meyrink is definitely worth reading though
> sometimes he is hard to understand and tedious in
> places.

Sounds interesting, ... and rather decadent. Makes me think of Ewers and his Alraune (by the way, is Alraune available online in the original English translation by Guy Endore?), who was also writing around the same time in central Europe. Very different from the contemporary writers up in England; Blackwood, Machen, M. R. James, and W. H. Hodgson. The variance between Germanic and Anglo-Saxon cultural approach, I assume, although I can't quite put my finger on the dividing line in this context.

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?588823

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 12 March, 2019 02:33PM
I have not read "Alrune" (though I have the book) but I have read cca. twelve stories by Hans Heinz Ewers and most of them did not impress me very much. "The Spider" is a classic and the best story by him (though the plot strongly reminds me of "The Inn at the Red Dragon" by the obscure Czech writer Jiri Josef Kolar). "The Blue Indians" is nothing to write home about but I liked the idea of ancestral memory that is the focus of the story and which was later used by horror/sci-fi/weird fiction writers. "Die Topharbraut" (I do not know if this one has been translated into English) is also a little creepy tale about a strange relation between the death of a young girl and an old mummy in a museum, that was supposed to have been found during excavations in Egypt. The rest of the stories were very weak, tedious, long-winded sometimes. As you say, they are a far cry from Machen, Blackwood and other English contemporaries of Ewers produced. (Though, speaking of English authors of that era, I must say Ewers sometimes reminded me of some short works by Aleister Crowley)

Back to Meyrink; yes, the book you mention in your post contains stories definitely worth reading (and, as a bonus, there is a picture of Prague on the cover, as I can see :-)). "Bal Macabre", "Dr. Cinderella´s Plants" and "The Preparation" are definitely the best stories I have read by Meyrink so far.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 12 March, 2019 02:58PM
Sawfish Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Wow!
>
> Great recommendation!
>
> The Golem is available in German, from Project
> Gutenberg. I wish I could read it in the native
> language.


It is a great book though I must say it could be much shorter; there are passages that are almost boring). Also, Meyrink is sometimes uselessly over-complex in expressing his ideas so it requires all your attention in reading to understand what he wants to say. (and, to be honest, sometimes I did not get fully what the author meant, sometimes I needed to read this or that several times to understand ...) It is a weird book, one of them you probably need to read more than once to comprehend it exactly.

I also must say a potential reader of it should not expect any moving beings made of mud appear in the book; except for the title, it has no connection with the old Jewish legend. :-)
[en.wikipedia.org]

P.S. I made a mistake in my previous post; the sanation of the Jewish ghetto was in the first years of the 20th Century, not of the 20th.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 12 Mar 19 | 03:01PM by Minicthulhu.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 17 March, 2019 12:52PM
I just read "The Colossus of Ylourgne" and found no similarity between it and "The Golem" at all.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 17 March, 2019 07:50PM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I just read "The Colossus of Ylourgne" and found
> no similarity between it and "The Golem" at all.


Sorry to hear that. Hope you still enjoyed it, so your time was not all wasted.

It was very long ago I read "The Colossus of Ylourgne", but I seem to remember that sorcery was used to build an animated giant from smaller parts piled together, somewhat like the creation of a golem. I believe Clive Barker's story "In the Hills, the Cities" also has some similarity to "The Colossus of Ylourgne".

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 18 March, 2019 07:09AM
The original Jewish legend of Golem is about a rabbi who creates a powerful humanoid being (he uses clay) to serve him, but Meyrink´ "Golem" is something very different; it is an unknown being that is supposed to materialize itself in a special empty room in one of the old houses in the ghetto every thirty three years. To be honest, "The Colossus of Ylourgne" is one of the weaker stories by CAS; I prefer horror to fantasy. :-)

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Yluos (IP Logged)
Date: 18 March, 2019 02:22PM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The original Jewish legend of Golem is about a
> rabbi who creates a powerful humanoid being (he
> uses clay) to serve him, but Meyrink´ "Golem" is
> something very different; it is an unknown being
> that is supposed to materialize itself in a
> special empty room in one of the old houses in the
> ghetto every thirty three years. To be honest,
> "The Colossus of Ylourgne" is one of the weaker
> stories by CAS; I prefer horror to fantasy. :-)

While Colossus isn't one of my favorite stories, I don't think it's fair to declare it to be weak just because you prefer one genre over another. Smith himself stated that he preferred writing fantasy over other genres (or at least over science-fiction) and I think it shows in the quality of many of his fantasy tales.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 18 Mar 19 | 02:38PM by Yluos.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 18 March, 2019 03:47PM
I tried to be honest. Had I said I liked it, I would have lied. Some of CAS´s stories are great (The Uncharted Island, The Supernumerary Corpse, The Double Cosmos or Genius Loci which is one of the best stories I ever read), some are mediocre (The Enchantress Of Sylaire, The Haunted Chamber or The Ninth Skeleton) which is quite normal and natural, I guess.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Yluos (IP Logged)
Date: 18 March, 2019 04:41PM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I tried to be honest. Had I said I liked it, I
> would have lied. Some of CAS´s stories are great
> (The Uncharted Island, The Supernumerary Corpse,
> The Double Cosmos or Genius Loci which is one of
> the best stories I ever read), some are mediocre
> (The Enchantress Of Sylaire, The Haunted Chamber
> or The Ninth Skeleton) which is quite normal and
> natural, I guess.


I didn't want you to say you liked it. Like I said, it's not my favorite story either; it plods in several segments and feels a little pointless in itself. I just don't think it's fair to declare it to be poor on the basis of its genre.

I agree that the stories you listed are among the best and worst of his work, but I don't think genre has much to do with that. After all, some fantasy stories are better than others, just as some horror stories are better than other horror stories, and science-fiction and realism and children's literature and so on.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 18 Mar 19 | 04:49PM by Yluos.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 18 March, 2019 07:09PM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I tried to be honest. Had I said I liked it, I
> would have lied. Some of CAS´s stories are great
> (The Uncharted Island, The Supernumerary Corpse,
> The Double Cosmos or Genius Loci which is one of
> the best stories I ever read), some are mediocre
> (The Enchantress Of Sylaire, The Haunted Chamber
> or The Ninth Skeleton) which is quite normal and
> natural, I guess.


Of these, I've read only The Enchantress of Sylaire and The Uncharted Island.

There are a bunch of CAS stories that seem to deal with the exploration of the solar system. These are mostly really weak so far as characterization and dialogue. I can't recall many titles, but typically you'd have two or more sort of 19th C adventurer-types and they'd want to explore something and get into a big jam.

Of the ones that work are The Vaults of Yoh-Vombis and Vulthoom.

Did you lke A Vintage from Atlantis?

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 18 Mar 19 | 07:11PM by Sawfish.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 19 March, 2019 04:02AM
Frankly, I am not a huge fan of stories about 17th Century buccaneers but this one is not bad at all. I have read cca. fifty stories by C.A.Smith and I cannot remember what most of them were about but the plot of "A Vintage from Atlantis" I can recall to mind very easily.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 19 March, 2019 07:18AM
I recently reread Smith's Atlantis stories, after about 25 years. I was on vacation to a beautiful volcanic Atlantic island, and had brought appropriate reading matter for the evenings, Poseidonis (Ballantine, 1973).

The stories I read:

"The Last Incantation"
"The Death of Malygris"
"The Double Shadow"
"A Voyage to Sfanomoë"
"A Vintage from Atlantis"
"Symposium of the Gorgon" (Not Atlantis, but closely related, and a favorite of mine.)

Much has been said of these before, and I will be brief, preferring to hold my impressions in private. "The Last Incantation" is very famous, and often mentioned, but to me it reads mostly like a morality tale; the follow-up "The Death of Malygris" is much richer in imagination. My words can not even begin suggesting the genius of "The Double Shadow", so I will only say it is one of his two or three greatest masterpieces. "A Voyage to Sfanomoë" is beautiful, with a sad (or sardonically fatalistic) ending. I hardly remembered anything from my first reading of "A Vintage from Atlantis", because I was too young then to appreciate its subtly refined content. But now I find it the best text I have read that potently hints at the elevated and ecstatic lives and culture of the people of Atlantis.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 19 Mar 19 | 07:33AM by Knygatin.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 19 March, 2019 01:39PM
Great post!

I'll reply interleaved, and from memory, which may be flawed...

Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I recently reread Smith's Atlantis stories, after
> about 25 years. I was on vacation to a beautiful
> volcanic Atlantic island, and had brought
> appropriate reading matter for the evenings,
> Poseidonis (Ballantine, 1973).
>
> The stories I read:
>
> "The Last Incantation"
> "The Death of Malygris"
> "The Double Shadow"
> "A Voyage to Sfanomoë"
> "A Vintage from Atlantis"
> "Symposium of the Gorgon" (Not Atlantis, but
> closely related, and a favorite of mine.)

Hah! Liked it as well! It almost seemed like the narrative POV was a proxy for Smith, himself, when young... :^)

An "alcoholically flaming youth", indeed!

>
> Much has been said of these before, and I will be
> brief, preferring to hold my impressions in
> private. "The Last Incantation" is very famous,
> and often mentioned, but to me it reads mostly
> like a morality tale;

Is this the one in which the damned near omnipotent Malygris asks his familiar, a small snake, as I recall, if it would be a good idea to call up the phantom of his first love?

> the follow-up "The Death of
> Malygris" is much richer in imagination.

Absolutely!

The setting is almost cinematographic, where they meet in a sort of dungeon to probe whether Malygris is dead or alive.

Then, about half of the participants sneaking away in the night, providing a sort of dreadful foreshadowing...

Too, it's an odd feeling for the reader when the familiar leaves at the end of the story, indicating that this time Malygris is dead. It implies that he stayed in a semi-dead state only long enough to wreak vengeance on his rivals--a final act of focused hubris and apparently motivated by Malygris' ability to foresee his own end.

This is entirely believable within the character context CAS created for Malygris. No small feat, in my opinion. Here I am, a 21st C cynic in his 70s, and I'm publicly admitting to believing that there could be a guy like Malygris.

Hah!

> My words
> can not even begin suggesting the genius of "The
> Double Shadow", so I will only say it is one of
> his two or three greatest masterpieces.

It is my single favorite CAS story.

I get a sort of thematic linkage to Masque of the Red Death--inescapable doom within a fixed setting. The story is filled with not only atmosphere, but very nifty narrative devices. For example, using a mummy, a dead entity that so far as the reader might surmise, is past all suffering, as one of the participants in the incantation, later to be possessed and transmogrified into--what?--amps up the threat to the narrative voice, the acolyte, because if death can't save him, nothing can, it would appear.


> "A Voyage
> to Sfanomoë" is beautiful, with a sad (or
> sardonically fatalistic) ending.

I can't remember it. It may be about two Atlantean scientist brothers who escape to Venus(?) and are hijacked by the plantlife there.

> I hardly
> remembered anything from my first reading of "A
> Vintage from Atlantis", because I was too young
> then to appreciate its subtly refined content. But
> now I find it the best text I have read that
> potently hints at the elevated and ecstatic lives
> and culture of the people of Atlantis.

The POV of the narration, a tea-totaling pirate, who witnessed the effect of the wine, then was forced to drink some, thereby experiencing its attenuated effects, was just great, in my opinion. Again, hugely atmospheric and near-visually concrete.

Thanks for sharing. A great exchange!

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Yluos (IP Logged)
Date: 19 March, 2019 08:56PM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
>"A Voyage to Sfanomoë" is beautiful, with a sad (or
> sardonically fatalistic) ending.

I always found the ending to Sfanamoë a glorious one. True the brothers and even their vessel were lost in the oblivion of orchids, but they so enjoyed themselves as they were slowly and gently consumed. The way they carried on with their passions even after the passing of their people is such a life-affirming journey. In spite of the merciless passage of aeons and the evanescence of human existence, this plays out like one of Smith's most optimistic tales.

Unless perhaps I'm missing something, and I've been seeing glorious delight where there is none. Haha :) I'm not as experienced as you or most people here I'll admit. Maybe everyone else would sneer at someone describing anything of Smith's in such sincerely bright, cheerful terms.



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 19 Mar 19 | 09:16PM by Yluos.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 19 March, 2019 09:31PM
For whatever it's worth, I think your interpretation is entirely justified.

Hah! I just remembered: I feel the same way about The Symposium of the Gorgon. Oddly optimistic because the narrator, by great good fortune, has foiled the cannibals.

Of course, he's bored to tears, but...

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 19 Mar 19 | 09:38PM by Sawfish.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 20 March, 2019 03:00AM
Yluos, that is an excellent impression of "A Voyage to Sfanomoë", and I agree. "Life-affirming journey" and "glorious", indeed! Only the ending is a bit ambiguous. It could be glorious (ecstatic transformation), but ultimately also very destructive; like the pleasure of drugs. I personally don't do drugs, and I quit smoking, ... only have a glass of wine every once in a while.

But on the whole, yes a very life-affirming tale. Grabbing life, taking risks, and living to the full. A fresh and youthful expression. I believe that was CAS's own affirmative perspective, even though living isolated and in poverty; compensating with intellectually expanded inner journeys.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 20 March, 2019 03:49AM
Sawfish Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> > "Symposium of the Gorgon"
>
> Hah! Liked it as well! It almost seemed like the
> narrative POV was a proxy for Smith, himself,
> when young... :^)
>
> An "alcoholically flaming youth", indeed!
>
>
> > the follow-up "The Death of
> > Malygris" is much richer in imagination.
>
> The setting is almost cinematographic, ...
>
> Too, it's an odd feeling for the reader when the
> familiar leaves at the end of the story,
> indicating that this time Malygris is dead. It
> implies that he stayed in a semi-dead state only
> long enough to wreak vengeance on his rivals--a
> final act of focused hubris and apparently
> motivated by Malygris' ability to foresee his own
> end.
>
> This is entirely believable within the character
> context CAS created for Malygris. No small feat,
> in my opinion. Here I am, a 21st C cynic in his
> 70s, and I'm publicly admitting to believing that
> there could be a guy like Malygris.
> ...


Thanks Sawfish for your generous comments. So heartfelt and true. You must be the ultimate CAS fan of deep appreciation. I agree with it all, and it enhances my own perspective. Your observations transcend academia.

I understand that your reading of Smith has mostly been from the Ballantine paperbacks published in the 70's, and I imagine you read them very closely. But have you read "The City of the Singing Flame"? It was not in those books, but is another of his masterpieces. Its publication is a bit confused, some books have only printed half the story; the full version has seven chapters.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 20 March, 2019 04:00AM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> "The City of the
> Singing Flame"? ... some books have only printed half
> the story; the full version has seven chapters.


Originally the second half was printed as a second story, "Beyond the Singing Flame". I don't know what Smith's intention was. To keep them together as one, or separate.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 20 March, 2019 09:58AM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Sawfish Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > > "Symposium of the Gorgon"
> >
> > Hah! Liked it as well! It almost seemed like
> the
> > narrative POV was a proxy for Smith, himself,
> > when young... :^)
> >
> > An "alcoholically flaming youth", indeed!
> >
> >
> > > the follow-up "The Death of
> > > Malygris" is much richer in imagination.
> >
> > The setting is almost cinematographic, ...
> >
> > Too, it's an odd feeling for the reader when
> the
> > familiar leaves at the end of the story,
> > indicating that this time Malygris is dead. It
> > implies that he stayed in a semi-dead state
> only
> > long enough to wreak vengeance on his rivals--a
> > final act of focused hubris and apparently
> > motivated by Malygris' ability to foresee his
> own
> > end.
> >
> > This is entirely believable within the
> character
> > context CAS created for Malygris. No small
> feat,
> > in my opinion. Here I am, a 21st C cynic in his
>
> > 70s, and I'm publicly admitting to believing
> that
> > there could be a guy like Malygris.
> > ...
>
>
> Thanks Sawfish for your generous comments. So
> heartfelt and true. You must be the ultimate CAS
> fan of deep appreciation. I agree with it all, and
> it enhances my own perspective. Your observations
> transcend academia.

Far, far too generous!

If there is any advantages I've had it's that I've had the time to read the stories many times, at many stages of my life. Needless to say, Smith holds up well, or I'd not be here now.

BTW, this is the same relationship I have with several books. Catch-22 is one of them. Multiple readings, perhaps 10+ in some cases.

>
> I understand that your reading of Smith has mostly
> been from the Ballantine paperbacks published in
> the 70's, and I imagine you read them very
> closely.

All true.

> But have you read "The City of the
> Singing Flame"? It was not in those books, but is
> another of his masterpieces. Its publication is a
> bit confused, some books have only printed half
> the story; the full version has seven chapters.

I have it upstairs.

I read it once. I'll read it again soon. Maybe I'll start a discussion thread.

Thanks!


I just discovered two very pleasant things in life: e-readers, and Project Gutenberg. Between spending $20 for a used Barnes & Noble Nook e-reader, and going to the Project Gutenberg free library, I've read a decent amount of Kipling for the first time. Not the kids' stuff, but The India Stories, etc.

Same with Stephen Crane, Ford Maddox Ford, Gibbon's 8-volume The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.

Aside from the $20 for the e-reader, all free.

[www.gutenberg.org]

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 20 March, 2019 11:07AM
Do you know about the Australian Gutenberg mutation? It is chiefly dedicated to older horror/sci-fi/weird fiction/mystery atc.

[gutenberg.net.au]

Some other useful sites dealing with older scifi and horror (and other genres).

[gaslight-lit.s3-website.ca-central-1.amazonaws.com]
[freeclassicshortstories.blogspot.com]
[woolrich3.tripod.com]
[freeread.com.au]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 20 Mar 19 | 11:08AM by Minicthulhu.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 20 March, 2019 01:19PM
TERRIFIC!!!

Thanks a lot!

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Avoosl Wuthoqquan (IP Logged)
Date: 22 March, 2019 12:23PM
Since this wonderful conversation refers to "The Death of Malygris", I feel obligated to mention this delightful Malygris sculpture.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 23 March, 2019 06:38PM
... Solaris is so bizarre I am beginning to feel sick. It even seeps into my dreams at night. Has never happened with a book before.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 24 March, 2019 07:49AM
I am going to read Solaris one of these days so I am curious if I will be affected in the same way like you are. :-)

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 24 March, 2019 01:35PM
I think you should stay away from it. It could make you mentally ill. That is my recommendation to you. But, of course, you will do as you please.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 24 March, 2019 03:30PM
Mentally ill? Are you reading "Solaris", or "Necronomicon"? :-)

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 25 March, 2019 04:19AM
I am sorry, I am not feeling very well right now. I have here seen suggestions of alien planet visions, that my mind is not stable enough or ready to handle. My outer and inner perceptions are shifting, or oscillating in a very unpleasant way. I don't know how else to describe it, a kind of psychosis or wakeful nightmare. Necronomicon, hahahaha, .... yes, maybe this is something similar? I think I will need a few days of rest, and come back to the forum later.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 25 March, 2019 12:15PM
Sawfish, in one of your previous post you wrote you just discovered e-raders. Do you know the site below? You can find tons of old weird/horror/fantasy/pulp/mystery/etc. fiction in epub/kindle format for a mere song. There are authors like Machen, Doyle nad others I have never heard of, compillations of old sci-fi stories, of weird tales, of gothic tales etc. etc.

[wildsidepress.com]

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 25 March, 2019 03:01PM
Wow!!!

Thanks a lot! :^

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 4 April, 2019 01:42PM
I am glad to say I am feeling much better now, after a week's convalescence. The doctor told me, after long talks, that I suffered from a mental overstrain, and recommended outdoor walks (at first accompanied by one of the pretty nurses, in the park behind the hospital) and other wholesome mundane activities. But told me to stay away from fantastic literature. Of course, I will not, and cannot, obey his last order. ... ;)

Recently I have read my first book ever by Philip K. Dick, The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, Lem's Solaris (translated by Joanna Kilmartin and Steve Cox), and in-between a few stories by Robert Aickman.

The Three Stigmata ... was rather well written. Dick is especially good with flowing dialogue (he was obviously a very social person). But I thought the book used too much focus on drugs and its negative effects, and on career striving, using science fiction more as a superficial setting tool. However, the early introduction of Palmer Eldritch was very evocative and suggestive of the possible mental changes in him after having visited and lived for ten years in a distant star system; and I was hoping for a weird re-visit and re-exploration there. But towards the end of the book his identity turns out too exaggerated and silly, with traditional sci-fi space-opera tropes, to be convincing. I will read more by PKD!

Solaris is partly written as a story, but in structure feels much as a treatise, with references to academic documents, searchings through multiple-volumed tomes in libraries, conflicting theories and ongoing arguments between scientists of different schools. It affirms that Lem in real life was academically schooled and a doctor of medicine. It is a very good book indeed, taking quite a serious literary approach, with many well thought through weird and fantastic elements on beautiful display. It has some action, but is also a very intellectual philosophical book. Some sections of it appear now as blanks to me, and that may be a blessing, ....

My favorites by Robert Aickman are still "The Wine-Dark Sea" and "The Swords", the first two stories I read. But after those I have been mildly disappointed. His stories are not clearly about supernatural phenomena (he can not hold a light to Blackwood, M. R. James, or to Walter de la Mare, for example, in this regard), although I have seen a few good ghosts in his stories; they are more concerned with socially dysfunctional individuals, and seem to deliberately introduce grotesque symbolical elements simply for the effect of driving home a psychological analytical point. The stories lack the mystical quality of the other mentioned authors; they are instead psychological, and therefore much more materialistic/worldly. In "The Inner Room" for example, which seems to be his most celebrated story by fans, I was really excited at the beginning, and waiting eagerly for the weird inner room of the doll-house to finally be exposed; instead it proved to be just a symbol for the girl's inner repressed psyche. That was really disappointing, ... and mundane.
Anyway, that is my personal impression of his work.
But "The Wine-Dark Sea" was a beautiful story. I will stick with him for a while longer, for I am still curious what more he has in store.


Next I will amend for my youth's sin of not reading Robert E. Howard's Conan tales. (But on the other hand I did read all of Kull, Bran Mak Morn, and Solomon Kane.) I made the same mistake (but much more serious I believe) with E. R. Burroughs, when I chose to read his Venus tales instead of his Barsoom tales!
So now I will go on marathon read with all of Howard's Conan tales, in the beautiful volume The Complete Chronicles of Conan: Centenary Edition! I hope my interest will keep up all the way. Generally I am bored by action adventures, but I know that Howard had deeper qualities sparkling in his prose, and at his very best he was at least/or nearly the equal of Lovecraft and CAS.

But first, for relaxation, a small short-story, "The Smell of Evil" by Charles Birkin.

P.S. The edition of Conan I have uses the texts from the original publications in Weird Tales, which are regarded as much much purer than L. Sprague de Camp's later heavily edited paperback versions. But there has also been another Conan edition (Wandering Star/ Del Rey) drawing directly from Howard's original manuscripts. Does anyone here know the nature of the edits in the original magazine versions, compared to the manuscripts? Were they minor and formal, or were they perhaps political, with excessive language and sections censured?

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Platypus (IP Logged)
Date: 4 April, 2019 02:56PM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> P.S. The edition of Conan I have uses the texts
> from the original publications in Weird Tales,
> which are regarded as much much purer than L.
> Sprague de Camp's later heavily edited paperback
> versions. But there has also been another Conan
> edition (Wandering Star/ Del Rey) drawing directly
> from Howard's original manuscripts. Does anyone
> here know the nature of the edits in the original
> magazine versions, compared to the manuscripts?
> Were they minor and formal, or were they perhaps
> political, with excessive language and sections
> censured?

So many of R.E. Howard's stories are public domain that there is always going to be a temptation to revise them for reasons of renewed copyright.

Whether there would be any actual excuse for reverting to manuscript, in R.E. Howard's case, I do not know.

My general prejudice is towards treating the published version as the final draft and the manuscript as an early draft. On the other hand, it is possible that Howard was strong-armed by evil editors, and accepted their suggested edits with gritted teeth and tears in his eyes. But rather unlikely, I'd say. It was probably more cooperative than that.

I know that WEIRD TALES versions of HPL's stories were remarkably faithful. Differences between published version and manuscript often resulted, not from editorial interference, but from HPL making additional edits after asking to see the proofs.

I'm not sure if they had a different relationship with REH.

The only Conan story I have an opinion about is "The Gods of the North" a/k/a "The Frost Giant's Daughter". There are a number of different versions and edits. The only version that can really claim to be authorized by REH is "The Gods of the North", since that was the version published in Howard's life. Of course, no-one ever wanted to use that version, because REH threw it directly into the public domain by sending it to a fanzine, after WEIRD TALES rejected it.

WEIRD TALES was REH's market for his Conan stories, and he did not want to step on their toes, so he changed the title to "The Gods of the North", and had Conan use an alias. Of course, any attentive Conan reader would have already known that "Amra of Akbitana" was just one of Conan's many aliases. I can understand the temptation to restore his original chosen title, and edit Conan's name back in. But it is really not necessary. The story is fine as is.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 4 April, 2019 03:34PM
Today I finished a short book called “Newton´s Brain“ by Jakub Arbes. It is a satire, dull and very boring, about a guy who was killed in The Battle of Königgrätz (1866), but what is very interesting about the story is the last few chapters are about a strange mechanical and electrical device that can travel faster than light so when it reaches some distant point in space, those aboard can see the past. It was written in 1877 so I wonder if it could be the first example of a time machine used in literature.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 4 April, 2019 04:03PM
Interesting input Platypus, thank you. The different versions of "The Frost Giant's Daughter" is mentioned briefly in the afterword of the book I have. Wright wrote Howard, telling him he didn't care much for the tale, and so rejected it. The version in my book is not the same that was later published in 1953, but this one is copyright 1976 by Glenn Lord, said to be the last published version "as left by Howard before his death". So I assume Howard also kept the original Conan version manuscript, after his rewrite.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 7 April, 2019 11:04AM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> Solaris is partly written as a story, but ...


So, today I finished Solaris. At last. I read a lot of positive reviews about it before I got to reading it so it may be that I expected too much; the fact is the book made no great impression on me. Of course, one can find a lot of fascinating things about Solaris (the descriptions of what the inteligent ocean can do, how it can reconstruct human memories into strange inanimate objects and living forms etc.), but most of the book was incredibly boring. In actual fact, there were places so dull, so tedious, I caught myself thinking about something else in reading them, a thing so rare with me … Chiefly, the never-ending, pseudo-scientific treatises, full of technical terms that were above my head, and the uselessly long dialogues between Kris and Harvey (and other members of the station, for that matter) with nothing going on for several pages, got really on nerves. Solaris is probably not a book I will read again and I must say that 1960s sci-fi has not gone down well with me so far because cca. two months ago I happened to read a short story collection by Clifford. D. Simak from the same period (1955-1960) and it left a lot to be desired like Solaris (1961) did. Slight disappointment.

P.S. I must say that in reading Solaris I sometimes felt very sorry for the translators because to translate such a text from a Slavic language into English must have been a real martyrdom. :-)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 7 Apr 19 | 11:05AM by Minicthulhu.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 7 April, 2019 03:17PM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> So, today I finished Solaris. At last.
> ... most of the book was
> incredibly boring. In actual fact, there were
> places so dull, so tedious, I caught myself
> thinking about something else in reading them, a
> thing so rare with me … Chiefly, the
> never-ending, pseudo-scientific treatises, full of
> technical terms that were above my head, and the
> uselessly long dialogues ...
> got really on nerves.

Hmm, ... while there was not much action (or 'echun' as Lovecraft and CAS would have put it) in the physical sense, it is full of "inner" action, intellectual and philosophical, and also has plenty of detailed descriptive observations of interesting phenomena (which also displayed an aesthetic sense in the author for beauty of form and color, to a remarkably high degree, I think. At times reminding me of both Smith and Lovecraft, and Vance.). Plus much of social and existential insights.
I think it is one of the best science fiction books I have read.
This shows how our brains perceive and appreciate things differently, partly probably from inborn leanings, but also from gradually built up previous experiences and references that define what we personally find meaningful.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 7 April, 2019 03:36PM
I assume you read the same English translation of Solaris that I did. It has been translated more than once, with different results. It is also a book that requires patience, ... I looked up all the technical terms I did not understand, and read about them until I did understand; that way the reading experience naturally becomes richer.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 7 April, 2019 04:06PM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I assume you read the same English translation of
> Solaris that I did.

I read a Czech translation of the book from 1971. To read the book with so many technical terms in English would be a suicide. :-)

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 8 April, 2019 12:54AM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> To read the book with so many technical terms in
> English would be a suicide. :-)

Not at all, not at all! A pleasure, and an honor to have it available in my hands! ;)


> I read a Czech translation of the book from 1971.

I think you are privileged then. I guess Czech and Polish are fairly similar, ... perhaps you can even understand each other in speech (and perhaps, all the way down to Hungary and Romania)?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 8 Apr 19 | 12:58AM by Knygatin.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 8 April, 2019 03:11AM
The languages (Czech and Polish) are similar in some respects but people do not understand each other. And Romanian and Hungarian languages are totally different from Czech language, like English is different from Italian or Portuguese.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Avoosl Wuthoqquan (IP Logged)
Date: 8 April, 2019 09:39AM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> P.S. I must say that in reading Solaris I
> sometimes felt very sorry for the translators
> because to translate such a text from a Slavic
> language into English must have been a real
> martyrdom. :-)

Translators of literature are gluttons for punishment. Most of us tend to enjoy wrestling with linguistic problems and doing a bit of research every now and then, not unlike lovers of cryptic crosswords. Couldn't get the job done otherwise. It's not a line of work you get into for the big bucks or the groupies. :)

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Yluos (IP Logged)
Date: 1 May, 2019 10:47AM
Minicthulhu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I tried to be honest. Had I said I liked it, I
> would have lied. Some of CAS´s stories are great
> (The Uncharted Island, The Supernumerary Corpse,
> The Double Cosmos or Genius Loci which is one of
> the best stories I ever read), some are mediocre
> (The Enchantress Of Sylaire, The Haunted Chamber
> or The Ninth Skeleton) which is quite normal and
> natural, I guess.


I've come to read The Uncharted Isle again after several years since my last reading, and although it has some gorgeous imagery and fluid writing, I have to admit that the story itself is underwhelming, in that it goes nowhere with its presented ideas and adds that cliché of a virgin sacrifice to a savage monster-god, with no thematic purpose. It feels like Smith was doing pretty well but then gave up on it, adding that laughable monster as a convenient way to shoo his protagonist off the island.

As maritime narratives go, I'd place A Vintage from Atlantis and The Isle of the Torturers above The Uncharted Isle, though for its first half UI had some splendid imagery and feelings of disorientation, which only makes the later half so much more unfortunate.

On the topic of the thread itself, I came across a weird Antarctic story by John Martin Leahy, In Amundsen's Tent, which was published in Weird Tales in 1928. It's a fun, eerie story with a vivid narrative, in my opinion. It's easy enough to find online so I'll leave other people to judge its merits for themselves.

I've also been reading some stories by Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore, most of which left me a little cold in spite of their popularity. But to be fair, I only saw Kuttner's Cthulhu Mythos stories, such as Hydra and The Hunt, and I usually find Mythos stories bland or forgettable compared to an author's more original work. On the other hand, Moore's famous Martian story Shambleau is beautiful in a visceral way, and I admire her warrior-maiden fantasies of Jirel of Joiry, which take some creative and dimensional steps far beyond the realms of Conan, though some of them are repetitive. Of these, I find Black God's Kiss to be the best, for its intuitive merging of human emotions and eldritch imagery in a fluid, dream-like narrative.



Edited 6 time(s). Last edit at 1 May 19 | 11:29AM by Yluos.

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Minicthulhu (IP Logged)
Date: 2 May, 2019 11:57AM
I cannot help myself but "The Uncharted Island" is, in my opinion, one of the best stories by C.A.Smith I have read so far. :-) As for "A Vintage from Atlantis", it did not impress me too much and I have not read "The Isle Of The Tortures".

"In Amundsen´s Tent" is a great story. I consider it to be what one could call an older, shorter and harmless sibling of "At The Mountains Of Madness." A polar expedition; death climate of Arctic; an extraterrestrial monster that seems to be dead but is not; it has it all. :-)

Several days ago I finished “A Man Who Found His Face“ (1940) by Alexander Belyaev. It tells a story about a dwarfish individual with a deformed face and uncoordinated movements who is, thanks to his handicap, a wealthy famous movie star, a kind of celebrity. He has got money but he is frustrated how he looks like so one day he decides to undertake a special medical treatment in an institution of a very eccentric doctor to change his physical looks for the better. After several months he leaves the institution, a handsom young man, only to find no one cares for him any more. No popularity, no fans, no admirers, no roles in movies, no celebrity parties, no slapping on the back by his “friends“ and no money …

I have been also reading several stories by David H. Keller, one of Weird Tales contributors, but they were average, not up to much, which I cannot say about a crazy but very entertaining story “Invaders from Outside“ by J. Schlossel, a kind of Star Wars precursor, published in Weird Tales (1925).

Re: A good weird/horror/sci-fi book to recommend
Posted by: Ancient History (IP Logged)
Date: 2 May, 2019 06:45PM
For whatever it's worth, my book WEIRD TALERS: Essays on Robert E. Howard & Others is out on amazon: [www.amazon.com]

This is predominantly a collection of my essays from print and online over the last few years, cleaned up and with updated citations and corrections, with a bit of original or expanded material. The essays include discussion of Robert E. Howard's correspondence with Clark Ashton Smith, H. P. Lovecraft, Robert H. Barlow, and others, as well as his connections with pulp writers and fans including Seabury Quinn, Otis Adelbert Kline, Frank Belknap Long, William Lumley, F. Lee Baldwin, Francis T. Laney, and Stuart M. Boland.



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