Goto Thread: PreviousNext
Goto:  Message ListNew TopicSearchLog In
Robert E. Howard's Conan
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 18 April, 2019 04:43PM
"The Hyborian Age", "The Phoenix on the Sword": At 26 Robert E. Howard had a far developed understanding of human character, and of intricate human intrigue. Remarkable. He was like an ancient oak of stored energy and layered memories, in a young body. Insights that are completely lost on modern citizens. (If he had lived today, and had been interested in politics, he might have enlightened people as to how completely fooled and self-denied they are by those in corrupt global control.)
And his unconventional grasp of Conan's phenomenal physique and cortex is uncanny. Howard had the poet's obsession with truth. His sentences are worth lingering over. I wonder where he got all this wisdom; perhaps by a mystical heritage transcending directly down into his soul?

It is confirmed; Lovecraft, Smith, and Howard were three literary giants, that have not been equalled since. Others have tried to emulate them, through the tool of intellect, ... but have lacked their mystical depth. I am waiting for "academics" to tap this mystery, rather than just gabbling historical fact records.

Re: Robert E. Howard's Conan
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 19 April, 2019 12:34AM
I was thinking the other day that when I first branched out into what was then called "adult fantasy", in the late 60s, Howard may have been the most widely read of the three. The first of Carter's collections of Smith, Zothique, was coming out, and I had yet to see any actual Lovecraft reprints in popular paperback series.

Your observations?

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: Robert E. Howard's Conan
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 19 April, 2019 03:15AM
Sawfish, I started reading fantastic fiction seriously in the early 1980s. Before that, as a kid in the 70s, I had seen Conan everywhere in the form of comics. And then the Conan blockbuster films came in the 80's (I saw them, but wasn't particularly enthusiastic). That was part of the reason I never read the books; "too popular" for me. I always preferred to search out stuff that was more obscure, more mystical, less action-oriented, and which few "ordinary" people had access too. Lovecraft and Smith I stumbled upon by chance. Although later I came to realize that Lovecraft is extremely popular (which has never lessened my enthusiasm for his work).

Re: Robert E. Howard's Conan
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 19 April, 2019 03:22AM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> And his unconventional grasp of Conan's phenomenal
> physique and cortex is uncanny.

Of course, as documented, E. R. Burrough's Tarzan was an inspiration for him. But I don't like to "explain" away things so easily, since I believe the background is more profound and also mystical.



Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.
Top of Page