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Smith/Derleth correspondence
Posted by: Martinus (IP Logged)
Date: 5 November, 2020 09:42AM

Re: Smith/Derleth correspondence
Posted by: Oldjoe (IP Logged)
Date: 5 November, 2020 10:08AM
I ordered this one from Hippocampus Press a few days ago, and I'm looking forward to cracking the pages. The related volume of letters between CAS and George Sterling was an interesting peak into CAS' early development as an artist, and I hope the letters with Derleth will provide similar insights into CAS' mature creative years.

Re: Smith/Derleth correspondence
Posted by: Oldjoe (IP Logged)
Date: 14 November, 2020 11:29AM
I've started reading through Eccentric, Impractical Devils, and while there's a lot of fairly uninteresting chatter about the business of getting stories published in pulp magazines, CAS does express some interesting viewpoints here and there on the craft of writing.

For anyone interested, I wrote a blog post about one of CAS' observations on the work of Charles Baudelaire in relation to the works of Poe and Lovecraft. CAS' ability to capture the essential differences between those writers very succinctly is quite impressive.

[www.desertdweller.net]

Re: Smith/Derleth correspondence
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 14 November, 2020 08:52PM
This is interesting.

I've never actually consider Poe's work as a whole, but have given some consideration to HPL's.
In what works do we find "...cosmic vastness which I find in Poe"? I am not sure I see this, on a superficial consideration.

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: Smith/Derleth correspondence
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 14 November, 2020 09:06PM
Hah! An additional subjective observation re French authors...

I've read some of Les Fleurs du Mal and Flaubert, Satre, Houellebeq. With Rabelais, you can't tell, but with Villon you can. My gut impression is that all of them (except Rabelais, maybe) have a certain subjective perception: they talk about how phenomena affect the *individual*--usually themselves, rather than the broader perspective of humanity as a whole.

So I don't expect much in the way of a cosmic POV from the Frenchies...

How about you?

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: Smith/Derleth correspondence
Posted by: Oldjoe (IP Logged)
Date: 15 November, 2020 10:28AM
Sawfish Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> In what works do we find "...cosmic vastness which
> I find in Poe"? I am not sure I see this, on a
> superficial consideration.

I think "cosmic vastness" is largely present in Poe's works in verse and prose poetry (not so much in his better-known short fiction). The best examples I know are the long poem "Al Aaraaf" and "Eureka - A Prose Poem" (both linked below). The latter is a challenging read, but fascinating nonetheless.

If you're as geeked out on this stuff as I can be at times, the third link below is to Francis Antosca's M.A. thesis "Tamerlane to Eureka: The Evolution of Poe's Cosmic Myth". Despite being an academic work, Antosca's thesis is quite readable, and his analysis of cosmic themes in Poe's verse is excellent.


[poets.org]

[xroads.virginia.edu]

[digitalcommons.uri.edu]

Re: Smith/Derleth correspondence
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 16 November, 2020 04:14PM
Thanks, Oldjoe!!!

Speaking of "geeked-out", I am teaching myself Python. I had a brief project writing a shell script to massage some metadata in digital image files, and I wanted to sorta "Rosetta Stone" the shell script to Python because it would really help me to more quickly understand the language.

I expect to be able to participate more on the ED forum.

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."

Re: Smith/Derleth correspondence
Posted by: Oldjoe (IP Logged)
Date: 17 November, 2020 09:44AM
Sawfish Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Speaking of "geeked-out", I am teaching myself
> Python. I had a brief project writing a shell
> script to massage some metadata in digital image
> files, and I wanted to sorta "Rosetta Stone" the
> shell script to Python because it would really
> help me to more quickly understand the language.

Sounds like a fun project Sawfish. I use Python every day in my working life, and compared to other programming languages that I used earlier in my career, Python is truly a joy to work with, given its tendency to concise expression and self-documenting code.

Re: Smith/Derleth correspondence
Posted by: Sawfish (IP Logged)
Date: 18 November, 2020 05:21PM
My only quibble so far is that the conditional blocks are not explicitly delimited, being reliant on levels of indentation.

But I'll get used to it, like I do with most other stuff...

Sawfish
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Life is a tragedy to those who feel, a comedy to those who think."



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