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Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: David Kartas (IP Logged)
Date: 28 October, 2008 07:14PM
One of the wrongly forgoten masters of the strange,H.H.Ewers was a german writer,writing from the turn of the century to ca. the 1920's.His fiction includes the weird novels of the Frank Braun trilogy,the most celebrated and notes in SHiL as well are

"Alraune" and "The sorceror's aprentice".

His short fiction is similar to W.C. Morrow,except having a distinct flavour-where Morrow explores cruelty of either humans or fate,Ewers aditionaly explores bloodlust, perversion and obsesion.

"Tomato Sauce" is quite a good example of this-so is his "Box of counters", which as I have read it at the same time as W.C.Morrow's "The ape,the idiot and other people",seemed like a tale Morrow WOULD have written-

while his "From the diary of an orange Tree" feels very Oliver Onions-like - it mostly reminded me of "Benlial" from O.Onions' "Widdershins".

Other stories are very horrible as well-The Dead Jew,which could also be called a mixture of Ewers and Onions, in that it features a coach ride with a corpse the drunken passangers all swear to have heard talking to them, as they ride it o to the morgue.It is actualy even beter then it sounds, because one isnt exactely sure.

"The end of John Hamilton Llewelyn" is my favourite tale of Ewers so far-it is,borrowing some words of HPL's "so infinitely like and so ininitely unlike" Fitz James O'Brian's "The diamond lense",only with a litle implied necrophilia (though never going beyond simple carresing and kissing).

I whole heartily advise anyone to try Ewers out-his "The Spider" is on gutenberg and elsewhere to view.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Scott Connors (IP Logged)
Date: 12 November, 2008 08:50PM
Ah, Ewers, everybody's favorite Nazi writer of weird tales! (He also wrote a biography of Horst Wessel, the Brownshirt "martyr" who lent his name to the party anthem.) This might be the reason why he isn't better known. HPL really liked "The Spider," as do I.
He is also a character in Kim Newman's novel The Bloody Red Baron, where he is a vampire and is supposed to "edit" an "autobiography" by Baron von RIchthofen that is actually "ghostwritten" by an Undead Edgar Poe! (Newman's "Anni Draculae" series is well worth reading: an alternate history where Van Helsing &Co fail to destroy the Count and vamps end up coming "out of the coffin," with both Elders and Newborn assuming prominent, but not necessarily dominant, positions in western society [except for the US].)

Scott

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: David Kartas (IP Logged)
Date: 13 November, 2008 07:09PM
well,he was a nationalist,but wasnt an antisemite,he advocated the jews position,had all but one book of his (I presume said Nazi biography) banned and died forgotten in the first half of the 1940's I believe.Would have been interesting to know what atitude the new governments would take on him- especialy concerning how they kept sabotaging him writing Vampir and police continously destroyed the manuscripts.

I mean,it was a NOVEL,WHY was this needed?

Also Scott-you realy should read the other tales I mentioned-youll never get a good taste of Ewers unless you do.

Also-a full recomendation on "The asorceror's aprentice"-it has a few "fanfic" ish parts,but not as many as Hodgson's "House on the borderland", which I also like and is overall wery enthraling and the climax is well worth it.I read it in only four days too,reading over 120 pages in one day.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Scott Connors (IP Logged)
Date: 13 November, 2008 08:26PM
I would very much like to read Ewers, but I don't believe there are any English translations currently in print. I can read German, provided I have a good dictionary nearby, but it takes me a long time, and I find that I really can't "do" fiction in any language but English (I miss the finer nuances), so I limit my Lesen auf Deutsch to histories. If you can recommend a source for Ewers, I will definitely follow it up.
While it is true that Ewers was an unperson in the Reich by the time he died (the latter tended to follow the former with monotonous predictability), I am pretty sure he was a party member before the Assumption of Power on January 30, 1933. That he fell out of favor isn't surprising: as Ernst Roehm remarked (right before he was murdered during the Night of the Long Knives), "all revolutions eat their children," and besides, Goebbels was a fickle SOB. So the mere fact that he ended up on the outside looking in doesn't mean that he wouldn't very much have liked to have been on the inside. By the same token, I can separate an author's work from his politics--otherwise I'd have to throw out all of my Herbert von Karajan CDs!

Scott

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: jimrockhill2001 (IP Logged)
Date: 13 November, 2008 08:40PM
Runa Raven published all of the available English translations, with a couple of new ones, about 8 years ago. You may recall, Scott, that my review of appeared on the alt.books.ghost-fiction group (before it wound up on Jessica's Weird Review). If you find a used copy, the second printing is the one to buy - the first is riddled with orthographical errors.

John Pelan was doing a collection of Ewers for Sidereal Press (whose Molesworth collection was rather nicely done), but I have no idea when that will apppear, as Sidereal has not produced any updates on that project for quite a while.

The novel ALRAUNE was reprinted by Arno/Books for Libraries, but I agree that its sequel SORCERER'S APPRENTICE is even finer. The third Braun novel, VAMPIRE, is supposed to be a mess, as published, and I have not yet read it.

There was an HHEwers discussion group for a few years (which is where I first met Doug Anderson), but that seems to have gone from dormant to dead over the past year.

Jim

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Scott Connors (IP Logged)
Date: 13 November, 2008 08:54PM
Hi Jim:
Yes, after I posted that last, I remembered that you had reviewed that Runa Raven Press collection on Jessica's site. I just found their website and they list the book as still in print. I would imagine that the publisher has copies of the second printing, so I specified that in my order. But Yog-Sothoth Neblod Zin! I could not believe the prices they're asking for Ewers' novels.
Runa Raven Press [www.runaraven.com].
Any idea whether John's collection would include novels or short stories? Someone (maybe even me?) should do a copyright search on the John Day editions and reprint them in facsimile if they're in the public domain.

Scott

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Gavin Callaghan (IP Logged)
Date: 14 November, 2008 09:26PM
> There was an HHEwers discussion group for a few
> years (which is where I first met Doug Anderson),
> but that seems to have gone from dormant to dead
> over the past year.
>
> Jim

The group still exists- but it seems to have become a spam site now. I keep getting "Horny Singles" ads sent to me from the Ewers site.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: David Kartas (IP Logged)
Date: 15 November, 2008 07:21AM
Ive talked to someone from Sidereal Press I think-didnt reply to my second message yet,but we talked about the volume their preparing.

Also,I would say The Sorceror's Aprentice ISA good,but there is one moment of fan-fiction-nesqueness in there, when Braun talks about the "worms who ate up all the holy water"- in context,that is a tad bit weird.

Also,a bit offtopic,but anyone know a working way to contribute something to the Weird Review?The specified email "doesnt exist" acording to my email and her personal email wasnt a good idea,id say.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 29 November, 2008 08:36PM
Hi Everyone!
I love Hanns Heinz Ewers so much that I am translating him! Here is a link to my web page where you can find several short stories and three novels in progress. The short stories I have translated so far are:

Edgar Allan Poe
The Lost Monkey
How Eleven Chinese Devoured Their Bride
The Eleven Thousand Virgins and the Four Holy Three Kings
Anthropoovaropartus
My Burial
My Mother the Witch
The Crucified Minstral

There will be more coming!

In addition:
Alraune Chapters one and two (chapter three will be done tomorrow)
Vampire Chapter one
Fundvogel Chapter one and most of chapter two

The link is:
[anarchistworld.com]

What I'm doing is putting partial chapters on blogs first. When the chapters are done they go on my webpage. Here are links to the blogs:

Alraune [ewersalraune.wordpress.com]

Vampire [anarchistbanjo.wordpress.com]

Fundvogel [anarchisticknights.com]

Hanns Heinz Ewers [hannsheinzewers.wordpress.com]

I am always interested in comments and feedback!

bright blessings-anarchistbanjo

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 29 November, 2008 08:58PM
In response to some of the other posts, Kessinger Publications does have a reprint out of Sorcerer's Apprentice.

I talked to John Smith at Sideral Press and he is planning to have an expensive 300 copy printing made hopefully by around Christmas but 30 Pounds seems a bit steep. Shrug.

I got tired of not having any English translations available and decided to just start doing them.

The English translation of Alraune by Guy Endors is not a very good one in my opinion and was censored. I'm not sure how much but I do know Chapter two of my translation is nothing like chapter two of his. There are enough differences to justify my own translation in my opinion.

Vampire is a curious book. Fritz Salinger was very good and smooth in his English translation, at least as much as I have read. (Only the first chapter of his translation) But he seems to round things off to the lowest and crudest denominator, to coin a phrase. My translation of chapter one in contrast seems to round things up into the spiritual and philosophical level giving it a totally different flavor. Again I think it is significant enough to warrant a new translation.

Fundvgel of course has never been translated. Chapter two is simply amazing, at least to me! It is probably my favorite so far. Chapter two is only available on my blog right now since I haven't finished it.

Prior to the short stories I have translated the available ones have been cherry picked to select the most horrible and strange. I haven't read the stories before I translate them so I never know what I am going to get. My selection is therefore more across the board.

Edgar Allan Poe is simply one of the most beautiful masterpieces I've ever read and I am very blessed to have been able to translate it!

Enjoy!

-anarchistbanjo

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: David Kartas (IP Logged)
Date: 30 November, 2008 10:50AM
Well,the Poe essay is on gutenberg with some original ilustration.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 30 November, 2008 12:42PM
If we are talking about the same thing, the Gutenburg essay is in German. It's the one I used to translate from.

As far as I know the English translation by Adele Lewison is not available online but is available as a reprint from kessinger books as well.

I read her translation after I had made my own and do prefer mine but that might be personal preference. Chuckle.

Adele Lewison of course is the one that made the English translation of The Sorcerer's Apprentice. She is also the one that Hanns Heinz Ewers dedicated his novel Vampire to. Apparently it is about their relationship.

bright blessings
-anarchistbanjo

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 2 December, 2008 08:51PM
Oops! I need to make a correction. There are two Lewisohns. Adele translated the Poe Essay and is the one HHE dedicated Vampire to. Ludwig Lewisohn translated The Sorcerer's Apprentice. That does explain the differences in quality. I assumed Adele might have wrote under the name Ludwig, guess that's what happens when a person assumes! Blush!

Anyway I got Alraune chapter three up on the webpage now.

I am just a fan like everyone else and continue to be amazed at the new stories. I am always eager to learn more about this interesting man and his life!

-joe

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 24 December, 2008 11:30PM
Merry Christmas!

What better gift than to present a new Hanns Heinz Ewers story!

Here then is both the link to Fundvogel chapter 2 and the short story taken from this chapter. They are the same except chapter two has one section at the front of the chapter. The original book Fundvogel did not include the section on the Cat Organ so I've taken new material from the short story and added it to the main book chapter.

[anarchistworld.com]

[anarchistworld.com]

This is one of my favorite things that I've translated so far! I love this book!

-joe

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 2 January, 2009 08:58PM
Here is the link to Vampire Chapter 2

[anarchistworld.com]

It's not surprising that Ewers got in trouble with the authorities! It doesn't take a rocket scientist to see that even in this chapter he was getting in trouble with politically sensitive issues! Talk about putting a sign on your back that says "kick me!"

In chapter two he mentions political events in World War I before America got involved. We have German Americans buying tickets on neutral ships to go back to the Homeland and help fight the war. But these ships are not so neutral, they bring German Americans by the thousands to concentration camps in France and England! The German Americans were robbed of their money. Funny, I never read about that in my history books! He also talks about the German Workers Organization and attempting to get German American workers to go on strike!

Is it any wonder that they wanted to know what was in the rest of the book! Just my thoughts on this!

-joe

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 5 January, 2009 07:12PM
Just in case anyone is interested in a little more accurate translation of The Spider here is the link:

[anarchistworld.com]

I find the differences just as fascinating as the similarities. Hopefully my translation runs a bit smoother and makes a little more sense.

I am curious about any comments and feedback. I am considering new translations of previously translated material because many of the existing translations seem to lack a certain quality that I feel should be there.

Just my opinion

-joe

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 10 January, 2009 05:52PM
While this is not horror, it is Ewers, in fact most of Ewers stories are strange fiction rather than horror. The sampling of translations I've done so far show Ewers as much more than simply a horror writer. Hopefully I will have the essay Intoxication and Art done by tomorrow.

Here is the link to The Curve for those that enjoy satire with their music!

[anarchistworld.com]

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 16 January, 2009 08:01PM
Well, it took a little longer than I thought it would but here is the essay Intoxication and Art.

Quite interesting considering it was written over one hundred years ago!

[anarchistworld.com]

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 23 January, 2009 10:00AM
Here is the link to an essay I just wrote:
Hanns Heinz Ewers and the Nation of Culture

It's too long to post here. Just some thoughts I've put together on this subject. Should be food for discussion.

[anarchistworld.com]

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Charlie2300 (IP Logged)
Date: 6 March, 2009 07:57PM
Hi

I'm new to this website; so pleased to find an authoritative website dedicated to CAS, a criminally neglected author to this day.

Anyway, I happened upon this forum topic and can announce that a collection of the short stories written by Hanns Heinz Ewers has just been published in English as a limited edition of 300 copies. Many of the stories therein are original translations. The volume "Nachtmahr - Strange Tales" is published by Side Real Press (Newcastle, UK, www.siderealpress.co.uk). This is the volume discussed above by anarchistbanjo (29 Nov '08).....and yes, it's retailing at £30, but it's a lovely thing.

I can't tell you much more about it at the moment as I've literally just been handed a copy and I'd not personally come across the author until now.

Contents

Introduction
Carnival in Cadiz
Mamaloi
The Death of Baron Jesus Von Friedel
Gentlemen of the Bar
John Hamilton Llewellyns End
The Dead Jew
The Spider
My Burial
From the Diary of an Orange Tree
The Tophar Bride
The Typhoid Mary
Edgar Allen Poe

I can provide further bibliographic information if you want it.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 12 March, 2009 09:03PM
Guess you've already got the word on John Smith's new book. I'm still waiting for my copy. I've got a link to his site posted on my main webpage.

In my corner I'm finishing up Hanns Heinz Ewers Volume I of a planned five volume complete short story collection. It will be around 350 pages for each volume as well. I already have the entire set of stories in the original German in the books:

Das Grauen
Die Besessenen
Grotesken
Der gekreuzigte Tannhäuser und andere Grotesken
Nachtmahr
Von sieben Meeren
Die schönsten Hände der Welt

Many stories have been duplicated but these books contain the complete list. There will be five 350 page volumes at least. I am currently in negotiations.

Immediately after completing Hanns Heinz Ewers Volume I I will be focused on finishing Alraune. This too is currently under negotiations right now since several people are interested.

It is safe to say that my new translation of Alraune will be finished by this time next year and that there are people already interested in publishing it. A new translation is needed because of the censorship and poor translation in Alraune. The sexuality and relationship story between Frank Braun and Alraune were almost entirely cut in the Endor's translation.

Lastly I am toying with the idea of doing a reprint of Sorcerer's Apprentice since no one else seems to be interested. The sad truth is that Kessinger's reprint makes for an even smaller readership. I know I got my copy from there! I have been asked if I want to do a translation of it as well but I'm not keen on the idea. It is already pretty good as it is.

I am in contact with Dr. Kugel and while things move slowly, they do move. I also appear to be the only one currently translating.

bright blessings,

-joe

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Charlie2300 (IP Logged)
Date: 13 March, 2009 03:26AM
The first volume (of 4) Hanns Heinz Ewers' tales "Nachtwahr - Strange Tales" has just been published by Side Real Press, Newcastle, UK - see www.siderealpress.co.uk for full details. Limited numbered edition of 350 copies.

Contents

Introduction
Carnival in Cadiz*
Mamaloi
The Death of Baron Jesus Von Friedel*
Gentlemen of the Bar*
John Hamilton Llewellyns End*
The Dead Jew*
The Spider
My Burial*
From the Diary of An Orange Tree
The Tophar Bride*
The Typhoid Mary*
Edgar Allen Poe

* New translations

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Jojo Lapin X (IP Logged)
Date: 13 March, 2009 07:25AM
What? Why has nobody mentioned this before?

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Kyberean (IP Logged)
Date: 13 March, 2009 07:52AM
I don't think that they are getting your sarcasm, Jojo!

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Charlie2300 (IP Logged)
Date: 13 March, 2009 08:10AM
Apologies; I appear to have posted the same message twice!

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 19 March, 2009 08:07PM
Breaking news!
In cooperation with the Ewers estate Tyler Davis of the Agna Offensive, [www.theajnaoffensive.com] ,has a contract to publish Alraune with the intent to publish all three Frank Braun novels.

John Smith of Side Real Press, [www.siderealpress.co.uk] will be producing the informative intro like only he can do filling us in with research and info on Alraune. There will be a signed and numbered limited edition as well as the normal edition. Both will be using the Blaine illustrations.

I will be providing the first uncensored English language translation. The first five chapters will be made available on my website for free viewing. (chapters 1,2& 3 are already there)
[anarchistworld.com]

The remainder of the entire novel will be made available as I translate it via a rss feed that will not allow gong back to see old posts. Once it is set up it will display six pages of text every three days before it automatically updates. This means that if you just can't wait, the entire book will be made available in this limited fashion.

I will have my translation done by November or December of this year. Lots happening in the world of Ewers. Pass the news around. This will be big! I will let you know more as I know more.

-joe



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 19 Mar 09 | 08:31PM by anarchistbanjo.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Gavin Callaghan (IP Logged)
Date: 20 March, 2009 05:37PM
Someone should do a story where Frank Braun and Randolph Carter team-up.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 31 March, 2009 09:43PM
I've completed The Death of Baron Jesus Maria von Friedel and posted it on the Hanns Heinz Ewers blog. I will not be posting it on my website. I've posted enough on my website to get the word out, now I need to sell books!

I will have Hanns Heinz Ewers Volume I ready around the end of April. I still need to translate some new stories so it will be worth buying.

New stories will include:

The Death of Baron Jesus Maria von Friedel
The Button Collection
The Blue Indian
Delphi
Bible Billi

and possibly a couple more short stories. It will also include most of the stories that are on my webpage but not all of them. I'm only including material originally published prior to 1923.

Here is the link to the Hanns Heinz Ewers blog.

[hannsheinzewers.wordpress.com]

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 12 April, 2009 11:25AM
Happy Easter everyone! In reveiwing the stats I find that there are simply not very many readers of Hanns Heinz Ewers out there! There is a great need to get the word out about this brilliant writer. Because of this I am making all of my translated short stories public for now. Here are the links:

The Button Collection

[anarchistworld.com]

Bible Billy
[anarchistworld.com]

Delphi

[anarchistworld.com]

The Death of Baron Jesus Maria von Friedel

[anarchistworld.com]


I will be placing links to the Blue Indian and The Last Will of Stanislawa d'Asp as soon as they are ready. Then I will be focussing on Alraune. Hanns Heinz Ewers Volume I will still be available for those that want these stories in book form. I will be posting that info near the end of April. Enjoy!

-joe

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: David Kartas (IP Logged)
Date: 13 April, 2009 11:05AM
I thought you said you weren't gonna continue with these .

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 15 April, 2009 09:30PM
David Kartas Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I thought you said you weren't gonna continue with
> these .

I am conflicted about sharing my translations freely or trying to sell them for profit. I've written Dr. Kugel six different times for permissions on material after 1923 and he has even written me once asking if I would like a contract. I responded that I did want a contract, especially because I wanted to translate Fundvogel. I haven't heard back since. I'm frustrated about that. I have stories I've translated and can't use because they were published after 1923 and not in the public domain here in the United States.

I'm eager to resume work on Alraune but need to put closure on Hanns Heinz Ewers Volume I first. I could have already been done with a little cooperation. The stats are interesting. As a rough guess I would say there are around 3oo people in the world that will actively search out any available English translations of Ewers and most will pay lots of money. Add another 300 that are interested if they don't need to pay much and that is it. The bottom line is that I won't make any significant money on book sales of Hanns Heinz Ewers Volume I and no one else will either. In the long run I'm better off to make them all free and offer them in book form for those that prefer books. It will increase the readership.

David,
You started this thread. You shared your wisdom and knowledge of Hanns Heinz Ewers to those that have never had a chance to read him. For good or evil I've given people new translations that have never been translated before so they can form their own opinion. I do sense hostility from you. Would you prefer that I did not post new translations here in this thread?

Every week I do google searches to find places where people are talking about Hanns Heinz Ewers and there are not any unless I bring them up! This thread is one of the few existing threads on the entire internet and it all started as a way you could show how much you knew about Ewers and everyone else didn't. Well maybe Ewers is not what people have stereotyped him to be! Maybe he is not what you thought he was!

In any case I'm not going to get into a pissing contest about it. If you would prefer that I quit posting new Hanns Heinz Ewers stories on this thread just tell me right here on this thread to my face and I will quit. I may be conflicted but my actions are producing translations. I put them all on scribd.com two days ago and have already had over 400 views. Hopefully that will mean more readers of Hanns Heinz Ewers!

By the way, look at the number of veiws this thread has! Quite impressive! There is a lot of interest among a few people.

bright blessings
-joe



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 15 Apr 09 | 09:33PM by anarchistbanjo.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 24 April, 2009 08:34AM
Here is the link to the story The Blue Indians. This is one of my favorite horror stories.

The Blue Indians



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 24 Apr 09 | 08:35AM by anarchistbanjo.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 25 April, 2009 07:42AM
Hanns Heinz Ewers Volume I

[www.lulu.com]

Now Available as a Quality Paperback for $16.49 plus shipping

Includes these short stories and essays:

Hanns Heinz Ewers and the Nation of Culture

The Spider

The Crucified Minstral

Delphi

The Curve

My Burial

Anthropoovaropartus

The Death of Baron Jesus Maria von Friedel

The Button Collection

Bible Billy

The Blue Indians

My Mother the Witch

Intoxication and Art

Edgar Allan Poe

plus three sample chapters from the upcoming novel, Alraune

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 30 April, 2009 08:36PM
Hanns Heinz Ewers Private Study Group

I translate Hanns Heinz Ewers out of love and interest. Most of the stories or novels I have never read before and I get to read them for the first time with everyone else. It is frustrating for me to spend hours translating Alraune when I could be translating something else that I have never read before. Still, the most pressing need is a new uncensored edition of Alraune and I’m up for it.

I’m trying very hard to introduce Ewers to new readers. By now everyone should realize my translations do stand apart from what you might have read before and that is my particular skill and passion. Hanns Heinz Ewers needs to reach a modern audience with modern translations. I seem to be the only one doing it.

I wish that there were more hours in the day available to me for translation work. I truly love to translate more than any other hobby I’ve ever had. Here’s the bottom line. I’d like to create a Hanns Heinz Ewers Private Study Group. This is how it would work:

I would create several private blogs available only to the study group:

Horst Wessel
Rider in the German Night
Fundvogel
The Cabaret
The Girl Wonder of Berlin
Ghost Seer
India and I
Travels Through the Latin World
Short Stories of Hanns Heinz Ewers

I have all but these two, Rider in the German Night and Travels Through the Latin World. I have all the rest and am itching to discover what is inside them but don’t have the time. I will be ordering these last two books within the next few months. I would not be publishing these but offering them for private study and discussion.

Each week I would post about six pages of never before translated text into one of these blogs. It would be a grab bag with no rhyme or reason. I would email everyone which blog I posted in. But each blog will be continuous. Horst Wessel will start with the first six pages and each time I post in that blog it will carry on from where it left off. If I started a thirty page short story that story would be completed before I started another story in that blog but it might be weeks before I once more posted six pages to that blog.

This might seem crazy but after six months or a year there would be significant material in all of these blogs that no one else in the world has ever read in English before. Progress would be slow but it is a study group and hopefully conversations and friendships can develop. Some people buy limited editions because they want to be the first ones to read the material or in some cases the only ones that can afford to read the material.

This is a way for people to get advance knowledge of material that might be years away from publication. If you love Hanns Heinz Ewers this would be perfect. It would cost $5/mo, the price of a cup of coffee and a donut. There would be a membership subscription set up through paypal.

The first three entries will be to Horst Wessel, Ghost Seer and India and I. I hope to have these set up this coming week to get a jump start on things. If you are interested in joining this private study group please email me at anarchistbanjo@live.com and have private study group in the heading. I will need at least ten people interested before I will do it. In the meantime I will be doing these scattered six pages anyway to take a little break from Alraune once in awhile. Let me know if you are interested and then I will set things up.

Email me and let’s talk. Please realize that these studies will be slow going at only six pages per week but it is also material that will have never been in English before and that might be worth something to some of you. I know it is to me. I translate simply because I want to know how it reads.

-joe

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 6 June, 2009 01:30PM
Well I finally finished chapter four of Alraune. Here is the link:

[anarchistworld.com]

I will need to do some editing later but it looks pretty good! If anyone still thinks that a new translation is not needed they should read this chapter and compare!

The tension between Frank Braun and his uncle is absolutely tangible! Chapter Four is where they finally find Alraune's mother and get her to go along with their plans. It makes me wince just to read it!

-enjoy! As always, I welcome your comments.

-joe

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 21 June, 2009 09:17AM
By Hanns Heinz Ewers 1889

(Der Arme Teufel, 19 December 1889)
Translation by Joe E Bandel
Copyright 2009 by Joe E. Bandel
Protected under United States Copyright Law as a derivative work of a foreign Author originally published prior to 1923

Sphinx

The stony sphinx lies there in the wilderness.

Impotent sphinx, foolish sphinx.

Which riddle did the son of Oedipus solve?

How blindly and miserably he must have wept

At the murder of his father and the marriage night

With his mother.

Your swollen feet will never again limp,

No, you will never again dare tell the riddle,

-The one in sheepskin-That one-

But I ponder it. Yes, I will complete it!

I will not allow this to happen,

Your cold stone should be listening,

Should be breathing with life.

My only desire is to raise you,

To awe you with my power and my love!

Are you willing? Are you willing?

You are! You are!

Dead sphinx, mighty sphinx awaken.

Now your eyes glow, your hair flutters.

I hold your head and kiss your mouth.

There, beat your paws upon my breast,

Live, love, in wild embrace-

Ah-

Glorious red blood of murder!

Drops of blood are the answer

To a hundred riddles.


-Hanns Heinz Ewers

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 1 July, 2009 05:35PM
Censored text Alraune chapter five:

You won't see this in the Endor's translation!

cheers

-Joe

There was a knock at the door. It opened and Dr. Petersen stepped inside. In his hand swung a long glass tube, tightly corked and wrapped in wadding.

“Good morning, your Highness,” he said. “Good morning, your Excellency. Here- here it is.”

The princess sprang up, “Let me see-“

But the Privy Councilor held her back. “Slow down, your Highness. You will see it soon enough. If it is all right with you, we will get right to work.”

He turned to the assistant doctor, “I don’t know if it will be important, but just in case it would be a good idea if you-“

His voice sunk as he put his lips to the ear of the doctor.

He nodded, “Very well, your Excellency. I will give the orders immediately.”

They went through the white corridors and stopped just in front of No. Seventeen.

“Here she is,” said the Privy Councilor as he carefully opened the door.

The room was entirely white, radiant with sunlight. The girl lay deeply asleep in bed. A bright ray scurried in from the tightly barred windows, trembled on the floor, clambered up a golden ladder, darted across the sheets and nestled lovingly on her sweet cheek, plunging her red hair into glowing flames. Her lips were moving- half open- as if she were lightly whispering words of love.

“She’s dreaming of her prince,” said the Privy Councilor.

Then he laid his cold, moist hand on her shoulder and shook it.

“Wake up Alma.”

A slight shock flew through her limbs. She sat up, drunk with sleep.

“What do you want?” she stammered.

Then she recognized the Professor. “Leave me alone.”

“Come on Alma, don’t be foolish,” the Privy Councilor admonished her. “It is finally time. Be sensible and don’t give us any trouble.”

With a quick jerk he pulled the sheets away throwing her onto the floor.

The eyes of the princess widened, “Very good! The girl is very well endowed- that is convenient.”

But the prostitute pulled her nightshirt down and covered herself as well as possible with a pillow.

“Go away!” She screamed. “I won’t do it!”

The Privy Councilor waved to the assistant doctor.

“Go,” he commanded. “Hurry, we don’t have any time to lose.”

Dr. Petersen quickly left the room. The princess came up and sat on the bed, talked to the girl.

“Don’t be silly, little one. It won’t do any good.”

She attempted to caress her, massaging her with fat be-ringed fingers over throat and neck, down to her breasts.

Alma pushed her away, “What do you want? Who are you? Go away, away. I won’t do it!”

The princess would not be rebuffed, “I only want what’s best for you child. I’ll give you a pretty ring and a new dress.”

“I don’t want a ring,” screamed the prostitute. “I don’t need a new dress. I want to go from here. Why won’t they leave me in peace?”

The Privy Councilor opened the glass tube in smiling tranquility.

“Later you will be left in peace and later you can go. Meanwhile you have an obligation to fulfill that you agreed to at the very beginning. Ah, there you are doctor.”

He turned to the assistant doctor who had just entered with a chloroform mask in his hand.

“Come here quickly.”

The prostitute stared at him with terrified, wide protruding eyes.

“No,” she lamented. “No! No!”

She made as if to spring out of the bed and pushed the assistant doctor so hard with both hands on his chest as he tried to restrain her that he staggered back and almost fell down. Then the princess threw herself onto the girl with wide stretched arms, pressing her back into the bed with her mighty weight. Her fingers with their many rings clawed into the luminous flesh as she gripped a long strand of red hair in her teeth.

The prostitute struggled, kicking her legs into the air, unable to free her arms or move her body under this mighty burden. She saw as the doctor placed the mask over her face, heard him lightly counting “one, two, three-“.

She screamed and tried to turn her head to the side away from the mask, “No! No! I won’t! I won’t! Oh, I can’t breathe-“

Then her screams died away, turned into a pitiful weak whimper, “Mother, oh mother.”

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 11 July, 2009 08:55AM
I've just finished Alraune- Intermezzo and posted it on my webpage for those interested. Here is the link:

[anarchistworld.com]

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 28 July, 2009 04:22PM
For those that are interested I've been working on my Librarything library! Where the books are listed I've put the stories that are in them. That way if anyone is looking for a particular Hanns Heinz Ewers story they will know which book it can be found in. I have not collected all of his books because some are duplicates of existing stories. I have collected all of his stories and they will show up on this webpage!

[www.librarything.com]

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: David Kartas (IP Logged)
Date: 27 September, 2009 02:09AM
Say, is Goethe im Reichstag a strange story ?

One thing I would like to know : will you be translating C.33. ?

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 7 October, 2009 09:33PM
David Kartas Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Say, is Goethe im Reichstag a strange story ?
>
> One thing I would like to know : will you be
> translating C.33. ?


Unfortunately I haven't read Goethe im Reichstag yet. Chuckle, it's on my list. I will be translating C.33. Here is my current work plan. I will finish Alraune, then publish A Book of Fables, Then Hanns Heinz Ewers Volume II, Then Vampire, Then Mogani Nameh and Hanns Heinz Ewers Volume III.

Hanns Heinz Ewers Volume II will contain only stories that have never been translated before. C.33 has been translated and was in strange tales by Stephen Flowers. Hanns Heinz Ewers Volume III will by my translations of all previously translated HHE stories including c.33. Let's say you will need to wait about two years for it. I'm planning two books per year.

-joe

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: David Kartas (IP Logged)
Date: 8 October, 2009 03:35AM
IHave you read it ? If so, could you give me a hint of what the title means ?

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 8 October, 2009 09:41PM
I'm guessing it is a tribute poem to Goethe since it is surrounded by several other poems as well. He did write a tribute poem to Bismark in his youth and one about the death of the Kaiser. These won't show up anywhere either except in Kugel's biography.

Unfortunately I don't have that poem or story unless I may find it in Kugel's biography as well. It is only to be found in this book:

Der gekreuzigte Tannhäuser
Meuser und Messer, Berlin 1901
enthält:
Der gekreuzigte Tannhäuser Er
Liebe? Er
Von der goldenen Kätie (7 Gedichte)
I. Immer wieder
II. Du von rechts
III. Im Park
IV. Heut' Morgen
V. Am Morgen
VI. Ihr Hemdchen
VII. Eh' ich diesen Morgen
Armer Junge! Er
Eine Strafkammersitzung Er
Die Perle Er
Aus Stenie's Wäschekorb G
I. Auf dem Ball
II. Steinerne Herzen
III. So wie der Männer
IV. Wandschmuck
V. Illusionen
VI. Intérieur
VII. In der Hängematte
VIII. Im Theater
IX. Die Frau Oberst sagt
X. Stenie's Toilette
XI. Anbeter
Die Blumenspiele zu Nippes F
Der Spuk von Rammin Er
10 Gedichte
Lore
Erinnerungen
Am Thuner See
Excelsior
Carmen hominum solatium
Unterm Eschenbaum
Mutter
Hinter dem Gitter
Sommernacht
Minnie
Wie John Jack Vriesländer ein Künstler wurde Er
Venus Kallipygos Er
Goethe im Reichstag G
Genealogie G


This is the book I have, some fifteen years later. I did think I had all the stories/poems covered. I may have to buy that one as well. I should check to see if others are missing as well.

Der gekreuzigte Tannhäuser und andere Grotesken
Georg Müller, München 1916 (veränderte Auflage)
enthält:

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: David Kartas (IP Logged)
Date: 9 October, 2009 03:02AM
I meant C.33's title actualy, but that's also fun to know . Though personaly, a vampiric spectre of Goethe stalking the Reichstag would cetainly merritt someone's atention .

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 9 October, 2009 08:07PM
David Kartas Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I meant C.33's title actualy, but that's also fun
> to know . Though personaly, a vampiric spectre of
> Goethe stalking the Reichstag would cetainly
> merritt someone's atention .


"I suppose you don't remember me?" the voice stumbled. The voice, too, I knew surely! But in a different fashion- flying, soaring, as if gliding in lancers. But now the voice sounded quite sticky and pimping, as though on crutches.

At last:

"Oscar Wilde?"

"Yes," the voice stumbles, "almost! Say 3.3.C., that is what the prison has left of Oscar Wilde."

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 18 October, 2009 06:39AM
Hi everyone,
I haven't been on in a while but I have been busy! I'm currently working on Alraune chapter eleven. Trying to translate an entire novel is a lot of work and very slow going! I'm still hoping to have the entire book done by Christmas so John Smith of Sidereal press can publish it this spring.

Those wanting a sneak peak at it or wishing more Hanns Heinz Ewers material like poems, essays, fables and photos can check out my scibd site:

[www.scribd.com]

Quite a bit of stuff there!

-joe

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 24 October, 2009 08:19AM
Hanns Heinz Ewers German Text Online

Very little Hanns Heinz Ewers material is available online these days and in addition to my translations I'm trying to make it easier for those that prefer to read the original in German to find online material. The following texts have been made available courtesy of:

Harvard University, Rochester University, University of Toronto, University of California and Google digitized books.

They are offered as ebooks now in the public domain in the United States and Canada. I have simply gathered them together into one place where they can be found more easily.

You will need to go to my website:
[anarchistworld.com]
for the links at the bottom of the page. They will not load as scribd documents. Enjoy!


Alraune by Hanns Heinz Ewers 1911

Der Zauberlehrling oder die Teufelsjäger by Hanns Heinz Ewers 1909

Das Cabaret by Hanns Heinz Ewers 1904

Ein Fabelbuch by Theodor Etzel and Hanns Heinz Ewers 1901

Deutsche Kriegslieder by Hanns Heinz Ewers 1914

Der gekreuzigte Tannhäuser und andere Grotesken by Hanns Heinz Ewers 1916

Die verkaufte Großmutter by Hanns Heinz Ewers 1922

Steinerne Herzen by Hanns Heinz Ewers "Der arme Teufel", 14, Detroit (Michigan) 12.11.1898

Errare humanum? (Ps: Nazi) by Hanns Heinz Ewers "Der arme Teufel", 15, Detroit (Michigan) 19.11.1898

Mein Liebchen, die Malerin by Hanns Heinz Ewers "Der arme Teufel", 15, Detroit (Michigan) 16.09.1899

Rote Flammen part 1 by Hanns Heinz Ewers "Der arme Teufel", 15, Detroit (Michigan) 21.10.1899

Rote Flammen part 2 by Hanns Heinz Ewers "Der arme Teufel", 15, Detroit (Michigan) 21.10.1899

Pferdebahn und Sperling by Hanns Heinz Ewers "Der arme Teufel", 15, Detroit (Michigan) 21.10.1899

Schatten by Hanns Heinz Ewers "Der arme Teufel", 15, Detroit (Michigan) 28.10.1899

Der Fall Sternberg (Ps: I.H. Bergfeldt) by Hanns Heinz Ewers "Der arme Teufel", 15, Detroit (Michigan) 04.11.1899

? ? ? G (späterer Titel: Sphinx) by Hanns Heinz Ewers "Der arme Teufel", 15, Detroit (Michigan) 19.11.1898

Die toten Augen part 1 (mit Marc Henry) by Hanns Heinz Ewers Bote & Bock, Berlin 1913

Die toten Augen part 2 (mit Marc Henry) by Hanns Heinz Ewers Bote & Bock, Berlin 1913

Die toten Augen part 3 (mit Marc Henry) by Hanns Heinz Ewers Bote & Bock, Berlin 1913

Die toten Augen part 4 (mit Marc Henry) by Hanns Heinz Ewers Bote & Bock, Berlin 1913

Das Wundermädchen von Berlin Schauspiel in vier Akten by Hanns Heinz Ewers Georg Müller, München 1913

Hans Krüger-Welf "Hanns Heinz Ewers. Die Geschichte seiner Entwicklung." Leipzig 1922

Der Roman der XII 1909 includes Hanns Heinz Ewers

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: anarchistbanjo (IP Logged)
Date: 2 January, 2010 10:16AM
My translation of Alraune is now available as an e-book!


[www.lulu.com]

Important Notice

This ebook edition of Alraune is intended as a low cost alternative for those wishing to explore the literature of Hanns Heinz Ewers for the first time. Other Hanns Heinz Ewers titles can be found at:
[stores.lulu.com]



In March, 2010, in time for the World Horror Convention, Side Real Press will be coming out with a special high quality signed and numbered limited edition. This will be limited to 350 copies of the book and will include the Mahlon Blaine illustrations and other interesting material. This special edition is expected to sell out quickly.


I am taking copies as payment and would appreciate anyone interested in purchasing one of these beautiful books to consider buying it from me. I will sign and personalize all copies that I personally sell. Email me at:

anarchistbanjo@live.com

Email me for more information. Otherwise this book may be purchased directly from Side Real Press.

[www.siderealpress.co.uk]


Sometime in 2011 a 1911-2011 Centennial Edition will come out as a regular hardcover with lots of additional information and research. Anyone wanting to be put on a mailing list to be kept informed of new materials should email me at:

anarchistbanjo@live.com



Or simply visit my website!

Anarchistworld.com

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 19 November, 2012 06:46PM
anarchistbanjo Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
>
> Alraune [ewersalraune.wordpress.com]
>


The idea of a woman grown like a mandrake, and without soul, is appealing.

I have tried reading the first chapter of Alraune. It's difficult. Situations and the locale are sketchily described at best. Occasionally there are colorful decadent descriptions, which stir the imagination, but then sentences slide off elsewhere. Characters suddenly appear, without much introduction, and enter into conversations. It's all very confusing. Who are they, what's going on here, where are they, and what is the meaning of this? It holds together unclearly, or chaotically.

I'm sorry. What is the special attraction of this book? Is Hanns Heinz Ewers similar to some other weird writer?

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: The English Assassin (IP Logged)
Date: 20 November, 2012 12:08PM
I'm not sure I can answer all your questions as I didn't perceive any of those things as problems - in fact I really enjoyed it. and am looking forward to Side Real Press publishing more of his work. It's certainly chaotic and rambling, but to be honest I'm struggling with well structured/plotted novels these days.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 20 November, 2012 02:43PM
I presume that you have read all of Alraune then. Does it have delicious weird/supernatural imagery? Or is it more of a psychological study of a woman that is apart from the rest of society?

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: The English Assassin (IP Logged)
Date: 21 November, 2012 07:33AM
I wouldn't say that its either of those things, particularly - although I can't say that I considered the novel in a lot of depth, as it is a fairly wild ride and I mainly just hung on and enjoyed it as that. It's a hard book to make analyse in a linear way, but I'll try: it certainly fits into the decadent tradition (to my relatively limited knowledge of the movement) and the 'Gothic,' reminding me of Poe, but also a little of Frankenstein and Faust, but more witty or even comic - and even a little surreal or absurd (a little like Meyrink, maybe...). But I can't say that I've ever read a novel quite like it. Its certainly supernatural, although I can't say that its supernatural imagery has stuck with me more than its grotesque and decadent imagery has. If its a psychological novel about gender then I can't say that it is very successful in that respect. I wouldn't say that it couldn't be read with that perspective, but, from what I remember, I didn't dwell on it in that way at the time. I wouldn't be surprised to hear that there's plenty of symbolism in the novel that I missed, but mainly it is the novel's grotesque and weird qualities that I enjoyed. It could be considered a flawed novel and it could be argued that HHE losses control of his novel in many places, but tbh I like that. It is also probably a novel guilty of delighting in its own cleverness and maybe guilty of thinking its more clever than it is (aren't we all), but again, I enjoyed its precociousness. I'd certainly read it again and I imagine that a further reading would add greatly to my limited understanding. To be honest, I think its a novel that if you get on board with it from the start, then you'll go with it - but if you don't then you might well hate it. Not much help, sorry! :)

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: jdworth (IP Logged)
Date: 21 November, 2012 11:33AM
Not a bad description, save that I'm not at all sure Ewers loses control here. I've not had the chance to read his Vampire, but I have read the other two novels in the Frank Braun trilogy (The Sorcerer's Apprentice and Alraune), as well as a couple of collections of his shorter works, and I would agree that he fits quite well into the Decadent movement... in fact, he himself says as much somewhere (though the exact memory escapes me). Personally I prefer Alraune to The Sorcerer's Apprentice, though others would disagree with that.

Part of the difference may, also, be the difference in translators. Meaning no disrespect to Bandel, I found his prose a bit too literalistic in its approach, resulting in a somewhat flat feel. Now I am perfectly aware of the flaws of the Endore translation, but I did find his prose to be more imaginative and poetic in feel, and this is something I find very much present in those pieces which I have read which were translated by Ewers himself. This approach, to me, enhances the effect of the surreal imagery and bizarre incidents tremendously, as much of the Decadent approach really does focus on the impressionistic imagination.

I would suggest going for the perennial favorite among Ewers' works, "The Spider", which can be found in any number of anthologies old and new. If you don't care for that one, likely HHE will not be to your taste. As for other weird writers... he does remind me at times of Erckmann-Chatrian in particular....

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: The English Assassin (IP Logged)
Date: 21 November, 2012 12:31PM
Yeah, I wouldn't like to overcommit myself too strongly to the stance the HHE loses control of his novel, I think I'd prefer to say that it is a little idiosyncratic, which is no bad thing imo, but maybe too much so for some people's tastes...

Again, I wouldn't want to overstate this, but I'd say that it could be argued that it is slightly modernist (or proto-modernist?) in its approach, if not in its techniques, although I don't want to get into the whole modernism-bashing debate here. I couldn't put my finger on it, yet for some reason Alraune reminded me slightly of Moravagine by Blaise Cendrars (who I guess is more proto-post modernist than modernist?), although please don't ask me to back that statement up in any way! It could just be that I read them at approximately the same time...

Anyway, I only know the Bandel translation, which I really enjoyed.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Jojo Lapin X (IP Logged)
Date: 21 November, 2012 12:31PM
"The Spider," the only thing I have ever read of Ewers's, is indeed very good. There is what appears to be a curious Japanese ripoff of it, by Edogawa Rampo, but I forget the title.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 21 November, 2012 04:48PM
What did attract me about the little I have read of Alraune, despite my negative comment above, was Ewer's obvious intensity and reckles daring at decadence.

I have just now read "The Spider" online. Masterful. One can only feel respect for this man. Still, I don't find him to be as great a poet or as profound as Poe. He is more matter of fact. Nevertheless, and authority, with incredible power of observation. To me though, the application of spiders's mating onto humans, is a too commonplace idea. However, he does it so incredibly well, that I am deeply impressed. In fact, I was so severely disturbed by this story, it stirred up painful memories of two beautiful women who bewitched me, and whom I was unable to defend my person against, that I had to make myself a drink. Vodka and sloe juice. I am holding it in my hand right now. Oh, God please forgive me, drink in the middle of the week, my day tomorrow will be spoiled. But, I must . . .

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: jdworth (IP Logged)
Date: 22 November, 2012 12:23PM
No, I would agree that he is certainly not on the level of Poe; but I do find him quite worth seeking out. (I really would like to get my hands on a copy of Vampire at an affordable price. Maybe, one of these days....)

Perhaps I should give Bandel's translation another go; I was just not at all taken with it when I tried it a few years ago. I will say, though, that I am very glad to have someone working on translating a goodly amount of HHE as I think a revival of his work, and an expansion of what has been previously available in English, is long overdue; so my hat is off to Bandel for his efforts in this regard. I simply wish it had more of the "verbal magic" I find in some of the earlier translations....

I should have mentioned a couple of other writers which his work reminds me of (at times): Maurice Level, who had a very realistic approach yet could convey a genuine chill and sense of the eerie when he chose; and Guy de Maupassant, who I would think influenced him directly (though he assimilated that influence and quite successfully made it his own); perhaps, too, a touch of Huysmans here and there....

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: The English Assassin (IP Logged)
Date: 22 November, 2012 07:51PM
Talking of Poe, can anyone here recommend a decent annotated complete works? Preferable a reasonably priced hard cover. I'm not so worried about getting all his poetry again as I do have a complete works of that, but obviously if its included, then that would be nice too. I've read good things about the Peithman edition - anyone know of it? Also a good Poe biography recommendation would be appreciated. There's the Peter Ackroyd one, but I can't imagine that it would be very good...

Apologies for the off topic nature of this post btw, but I didn't think it worth starting a new thread.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 22 Nov 12 | 07:53PM by The English Assassin.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: jdworth (IP Logged)
Date: 22 November, 2012 08:46PM
My recommendation would be the Mabbott set. Unfortunately, the hardbound are not all that affordable, and it isn't in a single volume -- there is one of his complete poems (including a fair number few people know about), two of his tales and sketches, and at least one of his major critical writings, and one devoted entirely to Eureka. However, a few things are missing here, such as the uncompleted Journal of Julius Rodman, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, etc. Unfortunately, Prof. Mabbott did not live to complete his work on these, which he intended to be published separately.

[www.amazon.com]

As you can see, even the trade paperback are rather high, but they are definitely worth it, as they include not only the works themselves, but copious notes, variorum readings (which in some cases can make a very large difference indeed), and a tremendous amount of fascinating information about all the pieces, as well as other matter.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: The English Assassin (IP Logged)
Date: 23 November, 2012 05:05AM
jdworth Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> My recommendation would be the Mabbott set.
> Unfortunately, the hardbound are not all that
> affordable, and it isn't in a single volume --
> there is one of his complete poems (including a
> fair number few people know about), two of his
> tales and sketches, and at least one of his major
> critical writings, and one devoted entirely to
> Eureka. However, a few things are missing here,
> such as the uncompleted Journal of Julius Rodman,
> The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, etc.
> Unfortunately, Prof. Mabbott did not live to
> complete his work on these, which he intended to
> be published separately.
>
> [www.amazon.com]-
> alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Poe+University+of+Illin
> ois
>
> As you can see, even the trade paperback are
> rather high, but they are definitely worth it, as
> they include not only the works themselves, but
> copious notes, variorum readings (which in some
> cases can make a very large difference indeed),
> and a tremendous amount of fascinating information
> about all the pieces, as well as other matter.

They sound great, but too rich for my meagre means right now, alas...

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: jdworth (IP Logged)
Date: 23 November, 2012 11:16AM
I know what you mean. One thing I would suggest, though, is avoiding the Penguin Science Fiction of Poe and Arthur Gordon Pym volumes. Though there is some quite good material in the notes there, the approach simply strikes me as one who has an axe to grind concerning Poe, rather than one who is wishing to provide context and insights, so a fair amount of what is there becomes very irritating. Taking a writer to task about certain views is one thing; but when such an approach, or an overly Freudian approach for that matter (common with Poe criticism), overwhelms the main purpose of annotating a work... then that person has gone overboard to the point of being nigh useless....

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: The English Assassin (IP Logged)
Date: 23 November, 2012 01:08PM
Thanks, JDW. I think I'll go for the Peithman edition. I don't think it is truly 'complete' (61 tales?) but I think it'll fill the gaps in my Poe knowledge nicely. It seems that it makes liberal use of the annotations from the editions you mentioned, according to this review [www.eapoe.org] which probably means it plagiarises massively, but as I'll be buying second hand that doesn't really concern me. My only reservation is it sounds like there's a lot of typos! I'm hoping that they're mainly found in the notes rather than the texts, but I'm probably just fooling myself... Anyway, I'll sleep on it for a bit as it doesn't seem like a particularly rare or sort out edition.

I'm not really sure how they can justify the prices for the Mabbott editions tbh. Sure, I'm all for academic research being rewarded, but I doubt anyone but the publishers will be making a living from this pricing policy. Better to get the good research out of the uni libraries and into the hands of the readers, I say.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: jdworth (IP Logged)
Date: 23 November, 2012 03:59PM
I'm not sure why the high prices there, myself, unless it is because it is a university press, and sometimes those tend to go for outrageous prices, especially if they are still used as textbooks for courses... in which case, the price is often astronomical.....

(I am sure there is a great deal more to it than that, but I have seen a number of shoddily-produced and meagre books come out through university presses through the years at prices that one would tend to expect on rare gems rather than relatively mass-produced books.)

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 24 November, 2012 04:19PM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> Ewers. . . incredible power
> of observation.

I should probably state that differently, because "incredible power of observation" doesn't quite seem an adequate description of his talent. Rather, it is a reflective and imaginative power. He dives into the subject matter and explores it in a fascinating and exhaustive way.

I am not all convinced, however, of the truthfulness in his observations. The decadence I saw in the first chapter of Alraune, just seemed a little too wild and imaginative, to be convincing. As if his prime purpose is to shock. A baby that enjoys a cigar in its mouth, for example, is to me merely tasteless, and not believable. It only made me feel sick. I am not sure I like this author. Where is his heart? He paints an ugly unaesthetic world. When Poe is decadent, there is at least a beauty of truth underneath the surface.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Knygatin (IP Logged)
Date: 24 November, 2012 04:33PM
Still, he brings up other interesting points of perspective.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 24 Nov 12 | 04:34PM by Knygatin.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: jdworth (IP Logged)
Date: 25 November, 2012 12:32AM
HHE's "heart" is something which one gathers over time, as he nowhere (at least, as far as I know it) states it, but rather lets it be revealed bit by bit through the dramatic action and consequences of his works. He had an unusual sense of ethics (I think), but nonetheless one which was very much there.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: The English Assassin (IP Logged)
Date: 25 November, 2012 09:13AM
Knygatin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> I should probably state that differently, because
> "incredible power of observation" doesn't quite
> seem an adequate description of his talent.
> Rather, it is a reflective and imaginative power.
> He dives into the subject matter and explores it
> in a fascinating and exhaustive way.
>
> I am not all convinced, however, of the
> truthfulness in his observations. The decadence I
> saw in the first chapter of Alraune, just seemed a
> little too wild and imaginative, to be convincing.
> As if his prime purpose is to shock. A baby that
> enjoys a cigar in its mouth, for example, is to me
> merely tasteless, and not believable. It only made
> me feel sick. I am not sure I like this author.
> Where is his heart? He paints an ugly unaesthetic
> world. When Poe is decadent, there is at least a
> beauty of truth underneath the surface.

I think you make some interesting observations there. From my limited readings of HHE I have to agree, he delights in the ugly and shocking grotesque and relishes depicting it with the glee of a director of video nasties. I have a feeling one of the reasons his work has faded from view, apart from the Nazi associations, is that it reeks a little too strongly of seeking attention through novelty, shocks and gimmicks, whereas Poe and others are maybe more nuanced... Still, I think there's room for both. Indeed, more than room, there's need for both - as neither the outer world nor the inner world are places of unchecked beauty. And certainly HHE is an author who can really get his hooks into me.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: jdworth (IP Logged)
Date: 25 November, 2012 12:14PM
The English Assassin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I think you make some interesting observations
> there. From my limited readings of HHE I have to
> agree, he delights in the ugly and shocking
> grotesque and relishes depicting it with the glee
> of a director of video nasties. I have a feeling
> one of the reasons his work has faded from view,
> apart from the Nazi associations, is that it reeks
> a little too strongly of seeking attention through
> novelty, shocks and gimmicks, whereas Poe and
> others are maybe more nuanced... Still, I think
> there's room for both. Indeed, more than room,
> there's need for both - as neither the outer world
> nor the inner world are places of unchecked
> beauty. And certainly HHE is an author who can
> really get his hooks into me.

I think a very good example of the complexity of what is going on with HHE in terms of the grotesque and ugly is his short story "Fairyland" (in Strange Tales), one of the pieces he translated into English himself. It contrasts the "normal" view of the maimed beggars and lepers of Haiti with that of a child, who is fascinated and finds them exotic, beautiful, and magical. While the adults are repulsed and perceive such surroundings as a kind of hell, the child sees them as being a part of fairyland; and HHE does this in such a way that each view is valid within its context; yet there is moer than a hint of irony in the contrast between these views itself which questions our own perceptions and reactions to the world around us, an irony made all the greater by the very careful use of language (word choice, cadence, etc.), lying somewhere between the fantastic and horrific and an almost repertorial relating of the tale.

Re: Hanns Heinz Ewers
Posted by: Siderealpress (IP Logged)
Date: 4 December, 2012 06:15PM
Dear all,

you may be interested to know that I have just announced that my latest book, Hanns Heinz Ewers, 'Brevier' (originally published in 1922 and newly translated by Joe E. Bandel) is now available for pre-order with shipping due to begin 10th December.

Futher details are available on the Side Real website HERE.

It will be in a smaller than usual edition of 200 copies, though there will also be an unlimited edition e-book and POD available via Joe.

This is a very interesting book as it doubles up as both a sampler of his works and a tour of his mind. For anyone who wants to get a sense of 'what he is all about' it might be a good place to start.

REGARDS!

J



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