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Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: phillipAellis (IP Logged)
Date: 28 April, 2013 05:52PM
Gavin,

firing off a quick query to your copy editor via email shouldn't be a problem. Especially as it demonstrates a willingness to cooperate. At the same time you may like to confirm whether there is a set style guide regarding spelling, punctuation, capitalisation, and so forth. Should you have subsequent dealings with the publisher, that knowledge would be helpful, and it shoes a willingness to work with the team.

I believe the recent edited work is the one I submitted my abstract to, since it was not edited by Waugh but two academics. May I check with them?

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: jimrockhill2001 (IP Logged)
Date: 28 April, 2013 07:40PM
"Lovecraft and Influence" sounds fascinating. Will have to look into that one. Thank you!

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: jdworth (IP Logged)
Date: 28 April, 2013 10:31PM
Gavin Callaghan Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> I know. The space constraints for that anthology
> killed me, as well. I ended up having to cut down
> a 65-page essay (plus 65 pages of appendices) to
> 24 pages or so. Even that went over the
> allotment, I know. But I begged and begged and
> Waugh relented. I'm kind of the opposite of an
> intellectual bully. An intellectual whiner?

*sigh* And here I went over and over the thing to compress and eliminate to fit into the allotted space. Even then, I had to leave out a note or two I wished to include... not to mention having to skip the explanation for the rather odd title of my piece to begin with -- a reference to Cabell's Beyond Life as, despite many differences, I see a great similarity between the two writers when it comes to love of tradition and the art of "writing beautifully"; but also simply because the original -- "You tell us, in effect, that Queen Anne is dead" -- is, in the context of Cabell's book and the subject, the perfect complement to Lovecraft's own approach to the literature of the period....

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: phillipAellis (IP Logged)
Date: 28 April, 2013 11:41PM
I am a latecomer to Cabell, and I appreciate very much his poetry. So far I've only read one book of sonnets, but I find them reminiscent in style to Wandrei and Long, and others of their generation. I am tempted to take up collecting his fiction.

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: jdworth (IP Logged)
Date: 29 April, 2013 12:47AM
phillipAellis Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I am a latecomer to Cabell, and I appreciate very
> much his poetry. So far I've only read one book of
> sonnets, but I find them reminiscent in style to
> Wandrei and Long, and others of their generation.
> I am tempted to take up collecting his fiction.


Not to take the thread further off-topic for long, but I strongly suggest you do so. Though it is almost the stereotypical thing to put forward with Cabell, I would recommend The Biography of the Life of Manuel (later published in "relatively" definitive form -- save for the lovely illustrations by Frank C. Pape -- as the 18-volume Works of James Branch Cabell). There are some differences of opinion about reading order, but the best may be the following:

I. Beyond Life: Dizain des Démiurges
II. Figures of Earth: A Comedy of Appearances
III. The Silver Stallion: A Comedy of Redemption
IV. Domnei (with "The Music from Behind the Moon"): Two Comedies of Woman-Worship
V. Chivalry: Dizain des Reines
VI. Jurgen: A Comedy of Justice
VII. The Line of Love: Dizain des Mariages
VIII. The High Place: A Comedy of Disenchantment
IX. Gallantry: Dizain des Fêtes
X. Something About Eve: A Comedy of Fig-Leaves
XI. The Certain Hour: Dizain des Poètes
XII. The Cords of Vanity: A Comedy of Shirking
XIII. From the Hidden Way (with "The Jewel Merchants"): Dizain and Comedy of Echoes
XIV. The Rivet in Grandfather's Neck: A Comdedy of Limitations
XV. The Eagle's Shadow: A Comedy of Purse-Strings
XVI. The Cream of the Jest (with "The Lineage of Lichfield"): Two Comedies of Evasion
XVII. Straws and Prayer-Books: Dizain des Diversions
XVIII. Townsend of Lichfield: Dizain des Adieux (which also contains "The White Robe", "The Way of Ecben", "Taboo", and Sonnets from Antan, as well as "other odds and ends")

This is a collection of novels, short stories, poems, essays, novel essays, and even a genealogy, as well as other things... all creating one vast whole -- something like the massive interconnected structures of Balzac's Comedie humaine or Moorcock's Eternal Champion/Multiverse cycle. As I have phrased it elsewhere: "Cabell was a fantasy-writer who will entertain, infuriate, and make one think (if only to come up with reasons to tell him why he's wrong about so many things). What he most certainly was not was a writer whose fantasy fits at all with the stereotyped limits placed on the field in recent decades. Instead, he is an exemplar of why, when one begins to explore the field, one finds it is something that can never truly be pinned down to any particular type of story, save perhaps the tale of the limits of the human heart and imagination."

I will also add that some of the novels -- particularly Figures of Earth (the only novel to actually feature Manuel himself, incidentally), The Silver Stallion, and Something About Eve, have something of the air of the fairy-tale about them in the manner of their writing... but a fairy-tale informed with a modern sensibility and a blending of a resigned sort of cynicism and deeply-held romanticism which work very much together, odd as that may sound. I will also warn you that Beyond Life is a very odd book in that it is largely in the form of an essay or, more properly, monologue, but of the sort of novel-essay one sees with older literature (such as, again, Balzac for example, or some of Gautier -- though the latter was less extreme in this regard). At any rate, it remains one of my personal favorites, in part because I find so much of it so beautifully written, and in part because certain portions of it I find quite provoking and exasperating.

There are a lot of other good things by Cabell as well, though, and you may enjoy looking into these, too. Here's hoping you enjoy the journey....

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: Gavin Callaghan (IP Logged)
Date: 29 April, 2013 06:02PM
I read, and liked, Jurgen. It had some laugh-out-loud moments, especially when Jurgen meets his dead father's ghost.

Waugh also nixed some pictures I intended to go along with my essay, again due to lack of space.

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The first pic (above), was intended to illustrate HPL's indebtedness to ERB's Tarzan stories, particularly the "Dum Dum" ceremony of the giant apes. HPL would seem to refer to this ceremony in "The Horror at Red Hook", when he writes that "Apes danced in Asia" to these horrors,; HPL simply transferring ERB's Dum Dum from Africa to Asia. The Dum Dum ceremony also involves the riualistic flaying and then eating of the dead carcass of an enemy, to the sound of jungle drums beneath the moon: ideas which HPL refers to via both the "corpse-eating cult of Leng" (again transferring the Dum Dum to Asia), as well as the eerie tom tom drums beneath the Afric moon (paraphrase from memory), referred to in "Herbert West: Reanimator".


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The second pic (above), was indtended to illustrate HPL's indebtedness to the polar Lost race stories of his youth, many of which -like Stilson's _Polaris -of the Snows_, were set in Antarctica.

I also had a third pic, which I'll upload later, of a characteristic Burroughsian pose, of an ape-man with his foot on the prey he has just killed: a pose later imitated by HPL's Denis de Russy in "Medusa's Coil", who puts his foot on the back of his prey, right after he kills his wife: who is likened to a (Burroughsian) jungle-cat.

Am now having trouble with the word "gorgon" in my proofreading for my book. I had the word in both lowercase and uppercase: so I went back to consult HPL's original text ("Medusa's Coil" in _The Horror in the Museum_) to see how he had it, and it turns out that HPL has it both uppercase and lowercase in the Arkham House text, as well. Confusion....

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: jdworth (IP Logged)
Date: 30 April, 2013 01:19AM
Interesting stuff, and I thank you for posting the illustrations. I'm not sure I agree with you on the level of certainty here, but I think it is distinctly plausible. When dealing with the pulp influences, of course, it becomes a rather difficult thing, as HPL read so bloody much of the stuff; we know he read the early Burroughs stories, and he loved stories about Antarctic exploration and lost cities and the like; and certainly he complained that, given some of the magnificent ideas in some of the material, someone should (though I may be getting the quote slightly off) "actually sit down and write the stories" rather than let these ideas remain entombed in such mediocre settings. Still, it is difficult to be certain how much was conscious influence, how much unconscious memory, and how much was simply parallel thinking -- such as we see, for instance, in resemblances between some of his early work (e.g., the WVJ collaboration "The Green Meadow") and Blackwood or Hodgson, whom he wouldn't encounter for some years afterward.

All that being said, it's a fascinating field for study, and I have no doubt you build a good case in support of your contentions. I look forward with considerable pleasure to seeing what you do with the subject. It should make for a very lively piece....

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: phillipAellis (IP Logged)
Date: 30 April, 2013 03:16AM
JD: thank you for the information re: Cabell. I am even more of a champer upon my bit. Champ! Champ! Champ!

Gavin: you make interesting points. I think it has been Joshi, among others, who has done a deal of work on revealing the range of influences on Lovecraft's work, many for only fragmentary instances and elements, so that the tales become a tissue of intertextuality. I look forward to reading yr paper when the book is published. :)

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: Gavin Callaghan (IP Logged)
Date: 6 May, 2013 07:22PM
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Here is my Dark Arcadia original cover suggestion for McFarland Press (vetoed.) I wished to show what went on inside HPL's head; symbolically show his interior mental processes; but apparently McFarland's marketeers were happier showing HPL's nondescript visage on the cover.

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Bottom half of the above cover.

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Optional cover suggestion for McFarland. I made these collages by cutting up copies of Dover's edition of Dore's Orlando Furioso by Ariosto, combined with ads from various turn-of-the-century and early 20th century magazines, including the American Mercury, with its ads by J. C. Leyendecker.

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Third alternate cover design for McFarland (vetoed.)

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I really hated to lose this illus. for Dark Arcadia. It is _Our Mother the Earth_ by Alfred Kubin (1901 or so.) I tried and tried and tried to find the one who owned the rights to this pic, but couldn't. I ended up writing to people all over Germany, to no avail. I refer to this picture in chapter six of my book.

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Illus. from one of ERB's Pellucidar novels, showing a Sagoth, one of the brutal ape-man slaves of the evil Mahar. The relationship of the Mahar to the Sagoths is roughly analogous to that between the Old Ones and the shoggoths in HPL's Mountains of Madness. Don't trust me on this; it was William Fulwiler who first advanced this theory.

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Burroughsian illus. nixed by Waugh for HPL & Influence. Denis de Rusy would later assume this characteristic jungle pose in "Medusa's Coil."



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 6 May 13 | 07:24PM by Gavin Callaghan.

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: wilum pugmire (IP Logged)
Date: 1 June, 2013 03:03PM
Just got an Amazon update that the book will be delivered between ye 17th and 24th of this month!

"I'm a little girl."
--H. P. Lovecraft, Esq.

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: Gavin Callaghan (IP Logged)
Date: 1 June, 2013 05:01PM
wilum pugmire Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Just got an Amazon update that the book will be
> delivered between ye 17th and 24th of this month!


Just received my own copy. Quite a thrill! Hope you like it---

If you like it, be sure to leave a glowing review on Amazon. If you DON'T like it, be sure to write a review, form it into a paper airplane, and toss it into a hurricane......

I still wish I had been able to aquire the rights to the Kubin painting, as I'd hoped. As it is, the male nudity to female nudity ratio in the illustrations is 2:2; including Kubin's Mother Earth would have made it 2:3, and thus safely within the hetero-range. Oh well....

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: phillipAellis (IP Logged)
Date: 2 June, 2013 03:28AM
Speaking of Gavin, he's very kindly given me a guest post for my blog. It is located at: http://www.phillipaellis.com/guest-blog-in-defense-of-dark-arcadia-by-gavin-callaghan/

You can get to his publisher's page for his book, via the image in the guest post, if you're interested. And I hope that you will be.

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: wilum pugmire (IP Logged)
Date: 15 June, 2013 02:52PM
My copy of H. P. LOVECRAFT'S DARK ARCADIA hath just arriv'd, just as my split pea soup is cooking on ye stove. Looking forward to devouring both! I shall spend ye day reading the book, & then tonight I will shew it on YouTube with commentary as a way of promotion.

"I'm a little girl."
--H. P. Lovecraft, Esq.

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: The English Assassin (IP Logged)
Date: 15 June, 2013 03:27PM
phillipAellis Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Speaking of Gavin, he's very kindly given me a
> guest post for my blog. It is located at:
> [www.phillipaellis.com]
> -of-dark-arcadia-by-gavin-callaghan/
>
> You can get to his publisher's page for his book,
> via the image in the guest post, if you're
> interested. And I hope that you will be.

A well argued defence, although I would say that the attacks mentioned by the members of this forum (myself for one) upon Gavin's previous output have not been focused upon the "more basic ideas of Freud: the existence of the unconscious; the importance of childhood experiences and infantile libidinal drives and desires; the interpretation of dreams; the role of repression in the development of hysteria and neuroses," but on the far more speculative idea that Lovecraft was a scatophiliac sexual degenerate, which seems to plumb the depths of Freudian sexual theory and present HPL as some kind of a Freudian cartoon of a sexual freak. Each to their own, but I see very little evidence to base these assertions on nor do I see any critical worth in them.

Anyway, this current text looks very interesting and I wish him well with this endeavor - I look forward to hearing WP's verdict upon it.

Re: HPL book by myself
Posted by: Gavin Callaghan (IP Logged)
Date: 15 June, 2013 04:20PM
wilum pugmire Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> > I shall spend ye day reading the book, & then
> tonight I will shew it on YouTube with commentary
> as a way of promotion.

Above & beyond the call, WP; much appreciated. We'll see if you like it...

I hope to read some of your own Mythos works someday; $$ is a problem in collecting all the Mythos fiction out there, and right now I'm concentrating on buying up several of Brian Lumley's works. I know they don't rate very high with HPL-scholars, but the packaging on them scares the bejesus out of me, so I find them fascinating.

The English Assassin Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> but on the
> far more speculative idea that Lovecraft was a
> scatophiliac sexual degenerate,

"H. P. Lovecraft: Scatophiliac Sexual Degenerate" was actually my original working title, but it got vetoed. I can't see why; I think there's definitely a niche-market for that----



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 15 Jun 13 | 04:25PM by Gavin Callaghan.

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